Free Resume Workshops – NYC Access and Employment Week | October 21-25

From the NYC Mayor’s Office for People with Disabilities:

New York City Access & Employment Week by the NYC Mayor's Office for People with Disabilities and Microsoft

Free Resume Workshop with Microsoft Word

Daily Sessions from October 21st – 25th 

11:00am – 1:00pm
Microsoft Fifth Avenue Store
677 5th Ave, New York, NY 10022

Workshop Description:

Whether you’re gearing up for college, an internship, or a career after completing higher learning, you need to have a professional resume. This resume workshop will help you learn how to stay organized, and jump start your job search by building your resume with Word.

Each Session Includes:

  • Tips for landing your first job
  • General Formatting and Page Length
  • Targeting your resume

Registrations

Register for Monday, October 21st at 11:00am 
Register for Tuesday, October 22nd at 11:00am
Register for Wednesday, October 23rd at 11:00am
Register for Thursday, October 24th at 11:00am
Register for Friday, October 25th at 11:00am

This series is part of NYC Access and Employment Week (10/21 – 10/25) by Microsoft and the Mayor’s Office for People with Disabilities. For a full schedule of events visit NYC.gov/AccessEmployment

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District of Columbia Child and Family Services Agency Career and Internship Fair | Wednesday, October 30

The District of Columbia Child and Family Services Agency (CFSA) is hosting a “Be The Change” Career and Internship Fair for master’s level licensed and seasoned social workers, recent graduates, and interns who are passionate about keeping children safe, supporting families, and driving positive change in the District of Columbia.

Wednesday, October 30, 2019
9:00 AM – 1:00 PM
200 I Street SE, Washington, D.C. 20003
1st Floor Multipurpose, Room 1001

This is a great opportunity to connect with recruiters from Child Protective Services, Permanency, Office of Youth Empowerment, In-Home, and Kinship about employment opportunities with their administrations.

The Career Fair will include:

  • Meeting with Agency Director Brenda Donald
  • Question and Answer Panel Discussion
  • The Day in the Life of A Social Worker
  • Health and Wellness Activities & Giveaways
  • On the spot interviews

Light refreshments will be reserved.

There is limited space. Register today! (It’s FREE!)

The deadline for registration is Friday, October 25 or when the event capacity is reached.

To schedule your “on the spot interview”, click here. Attendees are asked to dress professionally and to bring copies of their résumés and current licensure to the event.

This location is metro accessible / Navy Yard.

Center for Court Innovation (CCI) + Center for Alternative Sentencing and Employment Services (CASES) Recruitment Session | Tuesday, October 22,

UPDATE: There will also be representatives from Center for Alternative Sentencing and Employment Services (CASES), a non-profit committed to increasing public safety through innovative services that reduce crime and incarceration, improve behavioral health, promote recovery and rehabilitation, and create opportunities for success in the community.


Join us to meet and connect with representatives from the Center for Court Innovation, a non-profit dedicated to creating a more humane and effective justice system.

Center for Court Innovation (CCI) + Center for Alternative Sentencing and Employment Services (CASES) Recruitment Session
Tuesday, October 22, 1:00 – 1:50 PM
CSSW Room C06

Register here

Those interested in criminal justice reform, alternatives to incarceration, restorative justice, violence reduction, and survivor support are highly encouraged to attend. They will be a number of social worker opportunities opening up, and this will a great opportunity to learn about them, what the day-to-day might look like in these roles, and how CCI is making an impact in the field as a whole.

About CCI

Originally founded as a public/private partnership between the New York State Unified Court System and the Fund for the City of New York, the Center for Court Innovation creates operating programs to test new ideas and solve problems, performs original research to determine what works (and what doesn’t), and provides expert assistance to justice reformers around the world. Read more about them on their website.

About CASES

CASES envisions a city in which a person’s previous criminal involvement or behavioral health does not limit the opportunity to realize his or her life. Through continuous innovation and the strategic disruption of ineffective responses to crime, addition, and mental illness, they aim to create solutions for some of the city’s most difficult public safety and public health challenges. Read more about them on their website.

Career Talk with Dr. Joy Ippolito | Wednesday, November 20

Join us for an intimate conversation with Dr. Joy Ippolito, Social Impact Investment Director at American Family Insurance Institute for Corporate and Social Impact, on how she uses her social work background and 18+ years of experience in social impact policy and research to guide venture capital investments for health youth development.

Career Talk with Dr. Joy Ippolito
Wednesday, November 20, 12:30 – 1:30 PM
CSSW Room C05

Register here

Dr. Joy Ippolito is a Social Impact Investment Director  or the newly launched American Family Insurance Institute for Corporate and Social Impact. She has more than 18 years of policy, research, and graduate teaching experience in urban education, child welfare, juvenile justice, mental health, and supporting healthy families and communities. She uses this knowledge to guide venture capital investments she makes in healthy youth development. Prior to joining the Institute, Joy was a state policy executive and the first Anti-Human Trafficking Coordinator for the Wisconsin Department of Children and Families. She previously taught human development at the Urban Education Institute and conducted implementation and evaluation research at Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago, where she was the project manager for the federal evaluation of the Teen Pregnancy Prevention Initiative (TPPI) for Chicago Public Schools.

She holds a doctorate in human development and master’s degree in prevention science and practice from Harvard University, a master’s degree in clinical social work from the University of Chicago, and a bachelor’s degree in psychology from Loyola University Chicago.

Student Spotlight: Nancy Gershman ’20

Tell us about how your experience led you to your interests in dreamscaping and social work?

Social work has been my life’s calling, only I didn’t know it until I met Maureen, a social worker with three decades of experience in hospice and palliative care. It was while volunteering at a 25-bed hospice run by Visiting Nurse Service of NY that Maureen taught me how to take the temperature of the room to gauge whether a patient wants to share their emotional truth privately or within the family group.   

It was also in this New York City hospice where I did my first clinical work as a memory artist and bereavement volunteer. My work with hundreds of end-of-life patients and their families became the basis for my book, “Prescriptive Memories in Grief and Loss: The Art of Dreamscaping” (Routledge, 2019), co-authored with psychotherapist Barbara E. Thompson. 

What is dreamscaping?

Dreamscaping is a breakthrough intervention that is rooted in how the emotional brain encodes new memories.  Imagine one organizing principle—”bring me your favorite or good-enough memory” fulfilling an intention, wish, dream or longing. 

Here’s a story from the book to give you an idea:

Jane is a photographer, unable to work after the death of her mother, with whom she was very close. As I got Jane to focus on fun memories of Sylvia, she began to remember how much the two of them loved Christmas, despite being “atheist and Jewish.” During our exchange, I heard that rare bird of a memory that suddenly got Jane laughing. She recalled that as Sylvia lay dying in hospice on Christmas Day, she had this fleeting fantasy of Santa coming back for Sylvia so they could go off together on his sled. Before dreamscaping, Jane had never breathed a word of this to anyone, and yet here was a perfect example of a hidden resource that translated beautifully into a prescriptive memory, making it more available for use in coping with the loss of her mother. Later, when we constructed it as a tangible dreamscape, Jane was able to change her perception of a white marble sculpture by Sylvia (who was a sculptor) that seemed to be waving goodbye to one that was now waving hello. In Jane’s words, “…my feelings changed,” and dreamscaping “showed me you can make yourself believe different things.” (From Chapter 3, “Elicitation of Humor, Positive Emotion and Play in Dreamscaping.”)

What was your inspiration for writing this book?

I wrote this book knowing there was a community of learners out there, a wide range of therapists, end of life practitioners, and even spiritual care counselors drawn to short-term, novel, strengths-based interventions. These included art therapists who longed to work more collaboratively with clients and clinicians who wished to investigate what happens when you invite a memory artist into the therapeutic dyad. 

My goal in pursuing my MSW in Advanced Clinical Practice at a prestigious university like Columbia University was to be able to teach and practice dreamscaping, globally, and on a deeper level.

It sounds like you’ve already made a significant impact in the field. In what ways has your experience here at CSSW impacted you?

In my first year of field at FDNY Counseling Service Unit, I was dropped into group work with firefighters and EMTs —journaling, anger management, relapse prevention. Some days there would be up to 20 men and women around the table. I had stage fright at first until I learned that the “group does the group’s work.” In the same way that social workers learn not to fix people, I learned how to let things roll, intervening only when I felt a pearl had dropped and not marking that moment would be a lost opportunity.

As someone who entered the program with prior professional experience, what insights or advice would you like to share with other students?

Success can mean many things, but for me it was the opportunity to be taken seriously by my peers who were credentialed and spoke the identical language of advanced clinical practice. And if you have to do your life backwards as I have—proposing a job description to a Director of Bereavement Services that no one had ever heard of (“memory artist”), getting bereavement volunteer training at that hospice before being assigned to a floor, authoring a book based on clinical experiences with end-of-life patients and their families on that floor, going to graduate school, and requesting field placement with a population I never worked with before—DO IT. You can never be too young or too old to venture into the brilliant unknown and test yourself.

Managing Your Personal Brand

Whether you know it or not, you have a brand.

For better or for worse, how you communicate and engage with others, whether in person, online, or on paper, shape the reputation of who you are and what you bring to the table. It can be as simple as an email you sent to a supervisor, a brief interaction you had with a peer, or a status you posted on your social media page — people will judge:

Do you communicate clearly and concisely? Are you respectful? Do you have a positive attitude? What do you stand for? Would I want to work with you?

Regardless of whether these perceptions ring true, they don’t always represent how you may see yourself or hope to be seen. However, you have the power to change this.

Personal branding is the practice of developing and managing your reputation based on the value you bring to the world. If you take ownership of this process and do it well, it may not only improve your image but also raise your visibility and access to new opportunities.

A good starting point is determining what you want your brand to be, auditing your existing brand, and refining it to better showcase your strengths and personality. A few questions you can ask yourself are:

  • Who are you? What’s important to you, and what makes you unique?
  • Are these aspects of you accurately reflected in your professional interactions? Social media profile? Resume?
  • Do they come across authentically and credibly?

Read additional tips on personal branding on Idealist Careers and/or attend our upcoming workshop on Wednesday, October 16 with Josie Rosario ’19 to learn more about how you can build your brand and enhance your marketability.

Build Your Brand with Josie Rosario ’19 | Wednesday, October 16

Join us for an exciting workshop led by CSSW Alumna, Josie Rosario ’19!

Building Your Brand: Strategies to Enhance Your Marketability While in School
Wednesday, October 16, 12:30 – 1:30 PM
CSSW Room 301

Register

This is a great opportunity to learn how to effectively define and communicate your personal brand and increase your marketability for future opportunities.

About the Presenter

Josie M. Rosario, LMSW ’19, MSEd is an NYC-based therapist, who helps individuals and couples improve their self and relational awareness while supporting their journey towards feeling whole and being well. As the founder of the Healing Strategy, a brand and marketing consultancy for therapists, she supports private practice clinicians increase their visibility and impact. Josie splits her time between private practice, leading the Healing Strategy, and a mental health clinic.

Josie earned a bachelor’s degree from Columbia University, a master’s degree in education from Hunter College, and graduated with distinction from Columbia University’s School of Social Work. Josie was an early participant of Business Essentials at Harvard Business School and the Columbia Entrepreneurship Design Studio. She is also a trainee in family and couples therapy at the Ackerman Institute for the Family.

Josie is a native New Yorker, a proud Black Dominican-American woman, a die-hard Golden Girls fan, and deeply committed to continuing to manifest her ancestors’ wildest, most fiercest dreams.

Presidential Management Fellows (PMF) Program Webinars

The PMF Program Office will be leading a number of informational webinars for prospective candidates on the following dates:

  • Wednesday, September 25, 2019, from 1:00 – 2:00 PM (Eastern Time)
    • This session is open to all disciplines, and will be co-hosted by The Lab at OPM with a specific focus on Design
  • Wednesday, September 25, 2019, from 3:00 – 4:00 PM (Eastern Time)
    • This session is open to all disciplines, with a specific focus on Scientific, Technical, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM)
  • Friday, September 27, 2019, from 2:00 – 3:00 PM (Eastern Time)
    • This session is open to all disciplines
  • Monday, September 30, 2019, from 2:00 – 3:00 PM (Eastern Time)
    • This is session is open to all disciplines, with a specific focus on Cybersecurity and Information Technology (IT)
  • Wednesday, October 2, 2019, from 4:00 – 5:00 PM (Eastern Time)
    • This session is open to all disciplines, with a specific focus on diversity and inclusion

Here is the link to their webinar and an Adobe Connect Quick Start Guide on how to connect, conduct a connection test, and troubleshoot, as well as a copy of their presentation slides. Note that these webinars are limited to 500 participants. For more information, see their news and events page.

As a reminder, the 2020 PMF application will open at noon Eastern Time, October 3, and close at noon Eastern Time on October 17.

Make sure to check the PMF site for the latest updates and resources, including their Application Tips and Assessment Preparation Guide.