Author Archives: Carolina Castro

Jerry’s and Carolina’s Picks Nov 28 – Dec 16 (16:65)

Great leaders and trolls, the state of AIDS and of racial inequality, students who write and doctors who concertize, as well Saint-Saëns’ animals—all this and more in our last Picks of the season. See you in 2018! In the meantime, choose your own Picks using the University events calendar, including the Other Calendars list, and our Picks DIY Sources.

PICKS

November 28
6:30 – 8 p.m.
The Committee on Global Thought | Tällberg Foundation | Stavros Niarchos Foundation
Global Leadership in the 21st Century
This World Leaders Forum will feature a conversation about the demands facing great leaders among the 2017 Tällberg Global Leaders, and a conversation about the world today between former UN deputy secretary general Jan Eliasson and Vishakha N. Desai, senior advisor for global affairs. Casa Italiana, Teatro. (Global Solutions)

November 30
4 – 6 p.m.
Mailman | International Center for AIDS Care and Treatment Programs
World AIDS Day Screening and Panel Discussion: The End of AIDS?
A screening of segments from the Emmy Award-winning PBS NewsHour series, The End of AIDS? Followed by a panel discussion moderated by Wafaa El-Sadr, global director of ICAP. Featuring William Brangham, PBS NewsHour correspondent; Demetre Daskalakis, NYC deputy commissioner for the Division of Disease Control; David Hoos, project director of ICAP’s Population-based HIV Impact Assessment Project; and others. Allan Rosenfield Building, 722 West 168th St., Hess Commons. (Global Solutions)

6 – 8 p.m.
The Knight First Amendment Institute | The Brown Institute
Are Troll Armies Killing Free Speech?
In his essay for the Knight Institute’s Emerging Threats series, Tim Wu, Isidor and Seville Sulzbacher Professor of Law, observes that some of the forces undermining contemporary political discourse—such as “troll armies,” “flooding,” and propaganda robots—may be beyond the reach of traditional free speech protections. Wu will be joined in conversation by Julia Angwin, senior reporter at ProPublica; David Pozen, professor of Law; Jameel Jaffer, executive director of the Knight Institute; and Mark Hansen, director of the Brown Institute for Media Innovation. RSVP here. Pulitzer Hall. (Data and Society, Just Societies)

7 – 8:30 p.m.
Institute for the Study of Human Rights | Columbia’s Armenian Center | Research Institute on Turkey
Impossible Harms
A conversation with Henry Theriault, president of the International Association of Genocide Scholars, on human rights violations around the world, the state of genocide studies today, genocide prevention, reparations, denial, and more. Pupin Hall, Room 301. (Global Solutions, Just Societies)

December 1
4 – 6 p.m.
Institute for Research in African-American Studies
Who Studies African History?
Abosede George, associate professor of history and africana studies, will give a talk. George’s research has focused on the urban history of Africa, the history of childhood and youth in Africa, and the study of women, gender, and sexuality in African History. Schermerhorn Extension, Room 758. (Just Societies)

December 2
1 p.m.
School of the Arts | Lenfest Center for the Arts
Gallery Talks for Living in America: Frank Lloyd Wright, Harlem, and Modern Housing  
A conversation with Mario Gooden, co-director of the Global Africa Lab at GSAPP, and Damon Rich, adjunct professor and partner at Hector, an urban design, planning, and civic arts studio. Lenfest Center for the Arts, Wallach Art Gallery, 6th Floor. (Arts and Ideas)

2:30 – 4 p.m.
School of the Arts
Young Writers Present
Presenting creative writing by the students of Columbia Artist/Teachers (CA/T) from New York City high schools. Organized by writing professors Dorothea Lasky and Alan Zeigler, and student Lukas Novak ’18SOA. The Lantern, Lenfest Center for the Arts. (Arts and Ideas)

December 3
2 p.m.
Columbia University Medical Center Symphony Orchestra | P&S Club
CUMC Symphony Orchestra Fall Concert
Featuring conductor Cory Chang ’20P&S and students, residents, alumni, faculty, and staff from P&S, CDM, Mailman, Nursing, Nutrition, GSAS, NYPH, and Stamford Hospital. 630 West 168th, CUMC, Alumni Auditorium.

December 4
5 – 7 p.m.
Program for Economic Research | Center on Global Economic Governance | Columbia University Press | Finance Division at Columbia Business School
Persistent Racial Inequality in the US: An Economic Theorist’s Account
The 10th Annual Kenneth J. Arrow Lecture presented by Glenn C. Loury, Merton P. Stoltz Professor of the Social Sciences and Professor of Economics at Brown University. Discussants include Steven N. Durlauf, professor of economics at the Harris School of Public Policy at the University of Chicago; Rajiv Sethi, professor of economics at Columbia; and Joseph E. Stiglitz, University Professor and 2001 Nobel Laureate. International Affairs Building, Room 1501.
(Just Societies)

December 5
5 – 6 p.m.
Data Science Institute Colloquium
“Does This Vehicle Belong to You?” Processing the Language of Policing for Improving Police-Community Relations
Police body-worn cameras have the potential to play an important role in understanding and improving police-community relations. Dan Jurafsky, linguistics and computer science professor at Stanford University, will discuss. Schapiro CEPSR, Davis Auditorium, Room 412, 4th Floor.(Data and Society)

December 7 – 9
Historical Dialogues, Justice and Memory Network | Institute for the Study of Human Rights
Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice
How has the passage of time changed the way memories of historical violence, atrocity, and genocide are represented in the public sphere? In what ways do political, social, and cultural forces influence, appropriate, or stifle these memories in different ways as the original event recedes into the more distant past? See program schedule here. International Affairs Building, 4th Floor. (Just Societies)

December 9
1 – 4 p.m.
Zuckerman Institute Education Lab
Saturday Science: Make a Memory
Students, families, and community groups are invited to explore the workings of the brain through hands-on activities and demonstrations with scientists. RSVP here. 605 West 129th Street, Greene Science Center.

December 16
2 – 3 p.m.
Miller Theatre
Carnival of the Animals
Miller Theatre’s annual holiday tradition—a playful production that brings to life the 19th century French composer Camille Saint-Saëns’ musical The Carnival of the Animals with Lake Simons, designer and director. Purchase tickets here. Miller Theatre.

For RSVP, ticket availability, and other details, follow the links. We always appreciate hearing from you about future events.

Who is the red-haired woman? Jerry’s and Carolina’s Picks Nov 20 – Dec 6 (16:64)

A Nobelist reads, a world leader reflects, troll armies attack, and the Knight Institute defendsfrom free speech to global nursing, African history to climate-driven migration, the great Columbia Conversation continues.

 

 

 

 

 

November 30
6 – 8 p.m.
The Knight First Amendment Institute | The Brown Institute
Are Troll Armies Killing Free Speech?
In his essay for the Knight Institute’s Emerging Threats series, Tim Wu, Isidor and Seville Sulzbacher Professor of Law, observes that some of the forces undermining contemporary political discourse—such as “troll armies,” “flooding,” and propaganda robots—may be beyond the reach of traditional free speech protections. Wu will be joined in conversation by Julia Angwin, senior reporter at ProPublica; David Pozen, professor of Law; Jameel Jaffer, executive director of the Knight Institute; and Mark Hansen, director of the Brown Institute for Media Innovation. RSVP here. Pulitzer Hall. (Data and Society, Just Societies)

 

REMINDERS

November 21: Regional de NY
November 28: Reporting, Facts, and the Media in the Trump Era
November 29: The Science of Epidemics
November 30: Impossible Harms

PICKS

November 20
6:30 – 8 p.m.
School of the Arts | Department of English and Comparative Literature | Heyman Center for the Humanities | Society of Fellows
Orhan Pamuk
Orhan Pamuk, Turkish novelist, screenwriter, academic, and recipient of the 2006 Nobel Prize in Literature, will read from his new novel, The Red-Haired Woman. Followed by a conversation with Bruce Robbins, English and comparative Literature. RSVP here. Miller Theatre. (Arts and Ideas)

November 28
6:30 – 8 p.m.
The Committee on Global Thought | Tällberg Foundation | Stavros Niarchos Foundation
Global Leadership in the 21st Century
This World Leaders Forum will feature a conversation about the demands facing great leaders among the 2017 Tällberg Global Leaders, and a conversation about the world today between former UN deputy secretary general Jan Eliasson and Vishakha N. Desai, senior advisor for global affairs. Casa Italiana, Teatro. (Global Solutions)

December 1
4 – 6 p.m.
Institute for Research in African-American Studies
Who Studies African History?
Abosede George, associate professor of history and africana studies, will give a talk. George’s research has focused on the urban history of Africa, the history of childhood and youth in Africa, and the study of women, gender, and sexuality in African History. Schermerhorn Extension, Room 758. (Just Societies)

December 2
1 p.m.
School of the Arts | Lenfest Center for the Arts
Gallery Talks for Living in America: Frank Lloyd Wright, Harlem, and Modern Housing  
A conversation with Mario Gooden, co-director of the Global Africa Lab at GSAPP, and Damon Rich, adjunct professor and partner at Hector, an urban design, planning, and civic arts studio. Lenfest Center for the Arts, Wallach Art Gallery, 6th Floor. (Arts and Ideas)

December 5
6:30 – 7:30 p.m.
Earth Institute
Climate Change Impacts: Relocation to Safer Ground
What does climate science tell us about who may need to migrate? What are the legal issues surrounding managed retreat? Is relocation a feasible climate adaptation strategy? How can we ensure that people relocate to safe and secure places? Panelists will explore these and other questions. Includes Lisa Dale, lecturer in Sustainable Development; Michael Gerrard, director of the Sabin Center for Climate Change Law; and Marc Levy, deputy director of the Center for International Earth Science Information Network. Moderated by Radley Horton, Lamont Associate Research Professor. RSVP required here. Followed by a reception. Faculty House, 3rd Floor. (Climate Response)
  

December 6
5:30 – 7:30 p.m.
Columbia Nursing
Columbia’s Handprint Across the Globe
A conversation with Safwan Masri, executive vice president for global centers and global development; Tonda Hughes, director of the Office of Global Health Research; Kenrick Cato ’08NRS ’14NRS, associate research scientist at NewYork-Presbyterian; and Vidya Goberdhan ’03BC ’17NRS. Moderated by Jennifer Dohrn ’85NRS ’05NRS, director of the Office of Global Initiatives and its PAHO/WHO Collaborating Center for Advanced Practice Nursing. 560 West 168th St., 7th Floor. (Global Solutions)

6 – 8 p.m.
The Knight First Amendment Institute | Tow Center for Digital Journalism
From Private Companies to President Trump: Defending Public Discourse in the Digital Age
Alex Abdo, senior staff attorney at the Knight Institute; Emily Bell, director of the Tow Center for Digital Journalism; Gilad Lotan, vice president and head of data science at BuzzFeed. Pulitzer Hall. (Data and Society, Just Societies)

For RSVP, ticket availability, and other details, follow the links. We always appreciate hearing from you about future events.

Jerry’s and Carolina’s Picks Nov 15 – Dec 6 (16:63)

Failure and success, coal and the future, choro on campus, right-scaling everything from organisms to organizations hold onto your hat and feed your head! 

 

 

 

 

 

 

December 7– 8
The Center for Science and Society | Heyman Center for the Humanities | Teachers College
The Success of Failure: Perspectives from the Arts, Sciences, Humanities, Education, and Law
Scholars and practitioners in the arts, sciences (natural and social), humanities, economics, business, law, and education gather to examine the value of failure in making progress. Speakers include Carl Hart, Dirk Ziff Professor of Psychology; Alondra Nelson, professor of sociology and president of the Social Science Research Council; Chris Washburne, associate professor of music. RSVP here. Cowin Auditorium, 147 Horace Mann Hall, Teachers College. (Arts and Ideas)

REMINDERS

November 14: The State of Human Rights in the World Today
November 16: Risk with Laura Poitras
November 18: Saturday Science: Ready, Set, Go!
November 20: A. What Does the Food Justice Movement Mean for Public Health? B. Metaphors and Models: The Neuroscience of Comparison

PICKS

November 15
6 – 8 p.m.
Earth Institute | Energy and Environment Concentration | Urban and Social Policy Concentration | Environmental Science and Policy Program
Screening of Documentary From the Ashes
The film captures Americans in communities across the country as they wrestle with the legacy of the coal industry and  its future under the Trump Administration. Discussion features Michael Gerrard, faculty chair of the Earth Institute and Sabin Professor of Professional Practice at Columbia Law School; Patricia Culligan, co-director of the Urban Design Lab; and Adam Freed, sustainability principal at Bloomberg Associates and lecturer. Moderated by Ester R. Fuchs, director of the Urban and Social Policy Program. International Affairs Building, Room 1501. (Climate Response)

November 15
6 – 7:30 p.m.
Data Institute | Bernstein Center
Scale: The Universal Laws of Growth, Innovation, Sustainability and the Pace of Life in Organisms, Cities, Economies, and Companies
An author presentation by Geoffrey West, theoretical physicist and former president of the Santa Fe Institute. West’s more recent work focuses on developing a quantitative science of cities and companies for understanding their organization, growth, and dynamics, including implications for the accelerating pace of life and long-term global sustainability. Followed by an audience Q&A, reception, and book signing. RSVP here. Warren Hall, Room 309. (Data and Society)


November 16
6 – 7:30 p.m.
Donald Keene Center of Japanese Culture
From Cold-War Coeds to Pioneering Professors: The Forgotten Story of Japanese Women Who Studied in the United States, 1949-1966
A lecture by Alisa Freedman, associate professor of Japanese literature and film at the University of Oregon. Kent Hall, Room 403. (Global Solutions)

November 21
6 p.m.
Miller Theatre
Pop-up Concerts
Regional de NY
Pop-Up Concerts are free campus concerts that provide the opportunity to get up close and personal with musicians. Sit onstage and enjoy a free drink. Enjoy the evening with Regional de NY, a group of five musicians based in Brooklyn devoted to choro, one of Brazil’s oldest forms of popular music. Onstage seating is first-come, first-served. Miller Theatre. (Arts and Ideas)

November 29
4 – 5:30 p.m.
Mailman School of Public Health
Dean’s Grand Round Series
The Science of Epidemics
Lecture featuring Barun Mathema, assistant professor of epidemiology; Micaela Bakker-Martinez, assistant professor of environmental health sciences; Ron Bayer, professor of sociomedical sciences; Wafaa El-Sadr, University Professor of epidemiology and medicine; and Kerry Keyes, associate professor of epidemiology. Allan Rosenfield Building, 8th Floor, Auditorium.

December 2
12:30 p.m.
School of the Arts
Young Writers Present
Presenting creative writing by the students of Columbia Artist/Teachers (CA/T) from New York City high schools. Organized by writing professors Dorothea Lasky and Alan Zeigler, and student Lukas Novak ’18SoA. The Lantern, Lenfest Center for the Arts. (Arts and Ideas)

December 6
5 – 7 p.m.
School of Professional Studies
Narrative Medicine Rounds
Celebrating the Book Narrative in Social Work Practice
Narrative in Social Work Practice features first-person accounts by social workers who have integrated narrative theory and approaches into their practice. Speakers include the book’s editors Ann Burack-Weiss, associate faculty of Narrative Medicine Program; Lynn Sara Lawrence, psychotherapist; and Lynne Bamat Mijangos, practicum supervisor at the Narrative Medicine Program. 630 W. 168th St., Faculty Club of CUMC, P&S Building, 4th Floor. (Arts and Ideas)
For RSVP, ticket availability, and other details, follow the links. We always appreciate hearing from you about future events.

Jerry’s and Carolina’s Picks Nov 9 – 30 (16:62)

Check out tomorrow’s climate and medical center CAA events, and then there’s so much more. From real statistics to Trump-era news, climate facts to simulated healthcare, Laura Poitras to Jane Austen, challenging facts and fictions are on our syllabus.

 

 

 

 

 

 

November 18
1 – 4 p.m.
Zuckerman Institute | BioBus | Neuroscience Outreach | Columbia Neuroscience Society
Saturday Science: Ready, Set, Go!
Students, families, and community groups are invited to explore the workings of the brain through hands-on activities and demonstrations with scientists. RSVP here. Jerome L. Greene Science Center, Education Lab. (Future of Neuroscience)

REMINDERS

November 8: Nollywood: The Making of a Film Empire
November 9: Professional Journalism, Polarization, Post-Truth, and Post-Trump
November 10: Politics of the Present: Factions, Fears, and Fake News
November 13: A. What Will 21st-Century Fiction Look Like? B. University Lecture Featuring Professor Andrew Gelman C. Book Talk: The Sustainable City

PICKS

November 9
8 – 10 a.m.
CAA Alumni Relations | Columbia Connects
The Climate Change Threat to Water, Food, and Shelter
Kicking off Columbia Connects in New York, Lamont researcher Richard Seagar ’90GSAS will discuss the importance of climate change and its effects on us as individuals and as a society. Purchase tickets here. 30 West 44th Street, Columbia University Club of New York. (Climate Response)

1 –  2 p.m.
CAA Alumni Relations
Columbia Connects: Mary and Michael Jaharis Simulation Center Tour
Continuing the celebration of Columbia Connects, an exclusive tour of the 20,000 square foot state-of-the art facility housed within the recently opened Vagelos Education Center on the CUMC campus. RSVP here. 104 Haven Avenue, Mary and Michael Jaharis Simulation Center, Suite C-01.

November 14
6 – 7 p.m.
Graduate School of Journalism
Thought Leaders Series | Delacorte Lecture
TV, Criticism, and Politics: A Delacorte Conversation with Emily Nussbaum
The Pulitzer Prize-winner and television critic for the New Yorker will discuss her career, the golden age of television (and its dark side), and continuing to write about culture in the age of Trump. Keith Gessen, Delacorte Professor, will join the conversation. Pulitzer Hall, Jamail Lecture Hall. Participate on Twitter using #CJSLeaders. (Arts and Ideas)

November 16
6:30 p.m.  
Columbia University School of the Arts | Knight First Amendment Institute
Risk with Laura Poitras
A screening of Risk, a documentary about Julian Assange. Followed by a conversation with Oscar-winning director Laura Poitras; Alex Abdo, senior staff attorney at the Knight First Amendment Institute; and Maureen A. Ryan, associate professor of professional practice of film in the Faculty of the Arts. Lenfest Center for the Arts, Katharina Otto-Bernstein Screening Room. (Data and Society)

November 17
1 – 2 p.m.
Society of Fellows | The Heyman Center for the Humanities | Office of the Dean of Arts and Sciences in the Humanities
New Books in the Arts and Sciences: Jane Austen and Women Writers
A panel discussion celebrating recent work by Columbia Faculty. This lectures includes At Home in the World by Maria DiBattista and Deborah Nord (Princeton professors), and Reading Jane Austen by Jenny Davidson, associate professor of English and comparative literature. Heyman Center, Second Floor, Common Room.


November 20
6 – 7:30 p.m.
Mailman School of Public Health
What Does the Food Justice Movement Mean for Public Health?
To connect the dots between the food system, public health, and health policy, Mark Bittman, former New York Times columnist and lecturer, hosts a weekly lecture series on the food justice movement. Featuring Tom Colicchio, co-founder and board member of Food Policy Action, founder of Crafted Hospitality, and celebrity chef; Top Chef judge Paula Daniels, founder of the Los Angeles Food Policy Council; and Kathleen Finlay, president of Glynwood. Vagelos Education Center, Room 201.

November 28
6 – 7 p.m.
Graduate School of Journalism
Thought Leader Series | Lorana Sullivan Lecture
Reporting, Facts, and the Media in the Trump Era  
With Tim L. O’Brien, executive editor of Bloomberg View and Bloomberg Gadfly. O’Brien’s Trump columns have won awards, including honors from the Society of American Business Editors and Writers and the Deadline Club. Pulitzer Hall, Jamail Lecture Hall. Participate on Twitter using #CJSSullivan. (Just Societies)


November 30
7– 8:30 p.m.
Institute for the Study of Human Rights | Columbia’s Armenian Center | Research Institute on Turkey
Impossible Harms
A conversation with Henry Theriault, president of the International Association of Genocide Scholars, on human rights violations around the world, the state of genocide studies today, genocide prevention, reparations, denial, and more. Pupin Hall, Room 301. (Global Solutions, Just Societies)

For RSVP, ticket availability, and other details, follow the links. We always appreciate hearing from you about future events.

Jerry’s and Carolina’s Picks Oct 26 – Nov 20 (16:61)

Global fiction, Nollywood, neuroscience, the failures of statistics, the precariousness of truth, the cost of healthcare, the future of citieswhich of these essential Columbia conversations will you join? Enjoy and share your story.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

November 13
6 – 7 p.m.
Columbia Global Reports
What Will 21st-Century Fiction Look Like?
Adam Kirsch, acclaimed literary critic, will be in conversation with Orhan Pamuk, Nobel Prize-winning writer, about his latest book, The Global Novel: Writing for the World in The 21st Century, which aims to better understand literature in the age of globalization. Q&A followed by a book signing. RSVP required here. Graduate School of Journalism, Jamail Lecture Hall, Room 301. (Arts and Ideas, Global Solutions)

REMINDERS

October 31: 15th Annual Conference: The Age of the Individual: 500 Years Ago Today
November 1: A. Data Science Institute Annual Town Hall B. The Opioid Epidemic C. Where Next on Climate? The Future of the International Climate Negotiations D. Surviving the New Climate Communication Climate: Andrew Revkin
November 2: A. Building a Defensible Cyberspace: NY Cyber Task Force B. Complex Issues: M. Butterfly
November 4: 4th Annual: Family Fun Day
PICKS

October 26
5 p.m.
Zuckerman Institute
Does Neuroscience Need Behavior to Understand Brain-Behavior Relationships?
A discussion by John Krakauer, director of the Brain, Learning, Animation, and Movement Lab at Johns Hopkins University; György Buzsáki, Biggs Professor of Neuroscience at NYU School of Medicine; Rafael Yuste, professor of biological sciences and neuroscience at Columbia; and Roozbeh Kiani, assistant professor of neural science at the Institute for the Study of Decision Making at NYU. Roy And Diana Vagelos Education Center, Auditorium. (Future of Neuroscience)


November 1
5 – 7 p.m.
Narrative Medicine Program
The Cost of Healthcare
A Narrative Medicine Rounds with Elisabeth Rosenthal, Harvard-trained medical doctor and editor-in-chief of Kaiser Health News. Rosenthal will discuss her book An American Sickness: How Healthcare Became Big Business and How You Can Take It Back. P&S Building, CUMC Faculty Club, 4th Floor.

November 2
5:30 – 9 p.m.
School of Professional Studies
Film Screening: Tell Them We Are Rising: The Story of Black Colleges and Universities
By acclaimed filmmaker Stanley Nelson, Tell Them We Are Rising examines the impact historically black colleges and universities have had on American history, culture, and national identity. Space is limited; RSVP here by Wednesday, November 1. Low Library, Faculty Room. (Arts and Ideas, Just Societies)

November 8
6 – 7 p.m.
Columbia Global Reports
Nollywood: The Making of a Film Empire
How did Nigeria create the second largest movie industry in the world? A panel discussion with Emily Witt, author of Nollywood: The Making of a Film Empire; Brian Larkin, director of the Institute of African Studies; and Daniel Oriahi, director of the Nollywood film Taxi Driver (2015). See Taxi Driver film screening on November 9 here. RSVP for the talk here. Graduate School of Journalism. (Arts and Ideas)

November 9
5 – 7 p.m.
Institute for Social and Economic Research and Policy | Society of Fellows | Heyman Center for the Humanities
Professional Journalism, Polarization, Post-Truth, and Post-Trump
A discussion with Michael Schudson, professor of Journalism; Leonard Downie Jr., Weil Family Professor of Journalism at Arizona State University; and Bill Keller, editor-in-chief at The Marshall Project. Barnard Hall, James Room. (Arts and Ideas, Just Societies)


November 10
10 a.m. – 5:15 p.m.
Heyman Center for the Humanities | Society of Fellows | Institute for Social and Economic Research and Policy
Politics of the Present: Factions, Fears, and Fake News
Panel discussion on the current political climate. Topics include Ethnicity, Nationalism, and Democratic Futures and Religion, Capitalism, and the Rural White Working Class. The Heyman Center, Common Room. (Just Societies)

November 13
6 – 7 p.m.
University Events and Programs
University Lecture Featuring Professor Andrew Gelman
President Lee C. Bollinger and Provost John H. Coatsworth host the University Lecture with University Professor Andrew Gelman. Gelman will discuss ways in which statistical methods have failed, leading to a replication crisis in much of science, as well as directions for improvements through statistical methods that make use of more information. Followed by a Q&A with the audience and a reception. Registration is required and will open here on Tuesday, October 31 at 10 a.m. Low Library, Rotunda. (Data and Society)

7 – 8 p.m.
The Earth Institute | SIPA
Book Talk: The Sustainable City
Steven Cohen, executive director of the Earth Institute, will discuss his new book with Ester Fuchs, director of the Urban and Social Policy Program at SIPA. RSVP here. 536 W 112th, Book Culture. (Climate Response)

November 14
12:30 – 1:30 p.m.
University Program and Events | Columbia Global Centers
The State of Human Rights in the World Today
This World Leaders Forum features an address by Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein, United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights. Zeid will discuss a number of contemporary trends and the challenges facing human rights protection, both within societies and between them. Followed by a Q&A with the audience. Moderated by Safwan Masri, EVP of Global Centers and Global Development. RSVP here. Casa Italiana, Teatro. (Just Societies, Global Solutions)

November 20
4:15 – 6:15 p.m.
The Center for Science and Society | The Presidential Scholars in Society and Neuroscience | Seminars in Society and Neuroscience
Metaphors and Models: The Neuroscience of Comparison
How do metaphors shape how we think and communicate? How are they represented in the brain? A discussion by Dedre Genter (psychology, Northwestern University), Stephen J. Flusberg (psychology, Purchase College, SUNY), Alexander Rapp (psychiatry and psychotherapy, University of Tuebingen), and Stephen Casper (history, Clarkson University). RSVP required here. Morningside Faculty House.

For RSVP, ticket availability, and other details, follow the links. We always appreciate hearing from you about future events.

Jerry’s and Carolina’s Picks Oct 26 – Nov 9 (16:60)

Gloria Steinem, Chirlane McCray, Peter Thiel, and a host of other luminaries join Columbia faculty and students for the picks below. Enjoy and share your story.

 

 

 

 

 

November 1
4:30 – 6 p.m.
Data Science Institute
Annual Town Hall
Hear about recent highlights at the Data Science Institute, now under the leadership of Jeannette Wing, and discover emerging opportunities for engagement. Reception to follow. RSVP here. The event will be live-streamed here. Schapiro CEPSR, Davis Auditorium, Room 412. (Data and Society)
               

REMINDERS

 
October 23: The Case of Food in NYC
October 24: The Age of Consequences: Film Screening and Q&A
October 25: Fight the Power: A Global Conversation Exploring Hip-Hop and Social Consciousness and Ninth Annual Steve Miller Medical Education Day
October 30: US Food Policy in the Trump Era

PICKS

October 26
4 – 5:30 pm
Department of Population and Family Health | Forced Migration and Health
Refugees and Migrants: Addressing the Global Displacement Crisis
Learn how faculty, students, and staff of Mailman’s Program on Forced Migration and Health and the Department of Population and Family Health are working to address a growing crisis. RSVP here. Allan Rosenfield Building, Room 532. (Global Solutions)

October 27
9:30 a.m. – 12 p.m.
Advanced Consortium on Cooperation, Conflict, and Complexity
Women, Peace, and Security Program Launch Symposium
The launch of a new Earth Institute/Teacher’s College program features Gloria Steinem, writer, lecturer, and political activist; Elena Ambrosi, general inspector at the Republic of Colombia; Chirlane McCray, first lady of NYC; Lakshmi Puri, assistant secretary-general of the United Nations and deputy executive director of UN Women; and others. RSVP here. Low Library, Rotunda. (Global Solutions, Just Societies)


November 1
4 – 5:30 p.m.
Mailman | Office of the Dean
The Opioid Epidemic
A Grand Rounds with Dean Linda P. Fried and Lisa Metsch, chair and Stephen Smith Professor of Sociomedical Sciences. Participate using #DisruptiveThinking on Twitter. Allan Rosenfield Building, 8th Floor, Auditorium. (Just Societies)

 
6 – 7:30 p.m.
Center on Global Energy Policy
Where Next on Climate? The Future of the International Climate Negotiations
Jonathan Elkind, senior adjunct research scholar at CGEP moderates a discussion with Susan Biniaz, former State Department climate lawyer; Daniel A Reifsnyder, former co-chair of the Paris Agreement Negotiations and former deputy assistant secretary of state for environment at US Department of State; Scott Barrett, Lenfest-Earth Institute Professor of Natural Resource Economics at SIPA. Registration is required here. Pulitzer Hall, World Room. (Climate Response)

November 2
5 – 7 p.m.
SIPA
Building a Defensible Cyberspace: NY Cyber Task Force
The NY Cyber Task Force launched a groundbreaking new report, Building a Defensible Cyberspace, with a series of recommendations that would help make it easier to defend cyberspace without sacrificing the utility, flexibility, and convenience that has made the Internet so essential to our economies and personal lives. Task force members discuss the report. Includes Dean Merit Janow; Jason Healey, senior research scholar at SIPA; Melody Hildebrandt, global chief information security officer at 21st Century FOX; and Phil Venables, partner and chief information risk officer at Goldman Sachs. RSVP here. Participate on Twitter use #NYCyberReport. RSVP here. International Affairs Building, Room 1501. (Data and Society)


November 2
6:30 p.m.  
SOA
Complex Issues: M. Butterfly
Tony Award-winning playwright and SOA faculty David Henry Hwang and director Julie Taymor ’89HON discuss their collaboration on M. Butterfly, reimagined and remounted for the Broadway stage. Moderated by Christian Parker, director, dramaturg, and chair of the graduate theatre program. Register here. Manhattanville, Lenfest Center for the Arts, The Lantern. (Arts and Ideas)

November 4
11 a.m. –  4 p.m.  
Columbia Children’s Health
4th Annual: Family Fun Day
Special science and art activities for all. See activities here. Purchase tickets here. 103 Charlton Street, Children’s Museum of the Arts.

November 9
8:55 a.m. – 6 p.m.
The Center on Capitalism and Society
13th Annual Conference: Steps to Mass Flourishing: Social Values and Individual Experience
Includes Peter Thiel, PayPal co-founder; Peter Jungen, honorary chairman of the Center on Capitalism and Society; Edmund Phelps, director of the Center on Capitalism and Society; and others. (Data and Society)

For RSVP, ticket availability, and other details, follow the links. We always appreciate hearing from you about future events.

 

Jerry’s and Carolina’s Picks Oct 23 – Nov 6 (16:59)

From anger on the right to climate in the news, a vast Columbia menu. Enjoy and share your story. This week we hear from Tracy Quinn on a Miller Theatre program celebrating Harlem’s Ballet Trailblazer Arthur Mitchell.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

November 1
5 – 7 p.m.
Institute for Social and Economic Research and Policy | Heyman Center for the Humanities
Strangers in Their Own Land: Where Do We Go from Here?
Sociologist Arlie Hochschild discusses her acclaimed Strangers in their Own Land: Anger and Mourning on the American Right, which provides a clarifying and empathic view of the political convictions of conservative Louisiana voters. With commentary from Frederick Harris, dean of social sciences and professor of political science, and Nicholas Lemann, dean emeritus of the Journalism School, both of whom have personal experience of living in the American South. Barnard Hall, James Room. (Just Societies)

REMINDERS

October 17: Thought Leaders Series: 2017 Pulitzer Prize Panel
October 19: Music and Meaning
October 23: Defending Universal Values in the Age of Trump and Can Fossil Fuel Companies Be Held Liable for Climate Change?
October 24: DocTalks: Unraveling the Mysteries of Mind and Brain

PICKS

October 23
12 – 1:30 p.m.
SIPA | Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation Study Center | New York Southeast Asia Network | The Asia Foundation
The Future of Asia: Voices of the Next Generation
Based on the chapter titled The Future of Asia and Role of the United States from the Asian Views on America’s Role in Asia report, speakers will address the issue of Asian-American relations by representing their respective sub-regions in South Asia, Southeast Asia, and Northeast Asia. International Affairs Building, Room 1512. Registration required here.

October 23
6 – 7:30 p.m.
Mailman | Office of the Dean
The Case of Food in NYC
To connect the dots between the food system, public health, and health policy, Mark Bittman, former New York Times columnist and lecturer, hosts a weekly lecture series on the food justice movement. Featuring  Mary T. Bassett, commissioner of the NYC department of health and mental hygiene and associate professor of clinical epidemiology. Participate using #FoodJustice on Twitter. Space is limited; RSVP here. Vagelos Education Center, Room 201.

October 24
6 – 8 p.m.
SIPA
The Age of Consequences: Film Screening and Q&A
The film explores how water and food shortages, extreme weather, drought, and sea-level rise can lead to conflict. Q&A with Solomon Hsiang, chancellor’s associate professor of public policy at Goldman School of Public Policy; Richard Seager, research scientist at Lamont-Doherty; Marc Levy, deputy director of the Center for International Earth Science Information Network; and Sophie Robinson, executive producer of The Age of Consequences. RSVP here. International Affairs Building, Room 1512. (Climate Response)

October 31
9 a.m.
Center on Capitalism and Society
15th Annual Conference: The Age of the Individual: 500 Years Ago Today
Speakers will discuss individualism, emancipation, and self-actualization, tracing their roots to the day Martin Luther posted his 95 theses on the door at Wittenberg on October 31, 1517.  Includes Matthew Barzun, former United States ambassador to the United Kingdom; Peter Pazzaglini, senior scholar at the Heyman Center; Mark Berner, CEO and co-chairman at Telos; Roya Hakakian, founding member of the Iran Human Rights Documentation Center; Saskia Sassen, member of the Committee on Global Thought; and Edmund Phelps, director of the Center on Capitalism and Society. Full list of speakers and program here. RSVP here. Low Library, Faculty Room. (Arts and Ideas, Just Societies)

November 1
6 – 8 p.m.
Interdisciplinary Center for Innovative Theory and Empirics | Earth Institute
Surviving the New Climate Communication Climate: Andrew Revkin
Andrew Revkin, senior reporter for climate and related issues at ProPublica, will discuss the role of media and the scientific community in the current moment, and the challenges and opportunities of sustaining a public dialogue on climate change and related issues. Moderated by Peter de Menocal, dean of science in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences and founding director of the Center for Climate and Life. RSVP here. School of International and Public Affairs, Room 1501. (Climate Response)

November 2
4:30 p.m.
Physicians & Surgeons
Building A Better Biotech: The Story of Regeneron
A Dean’s Distinguished Lecture on Innovation in Biological and Medical Sciences with George Yancopoulos, president and chief scientific officer at Regeneron. Reception to follow. Roy and Diana Vagelos Education Center, Clyde and Helen Wu Auditorium, Room 201.

6:15 p.m.
See co-sponsors here
Celebrating Recent Work by Dennis Tenen

This lecture features Dennis Tenen, author of Plain Text: The Poetics of Computation and co-founder of Columbia’s group for experimental research methods in the humanities. The book challenges the ways we read, write, store, and retrieve information in the digital age. Includes a discussion with Brian Larkin, director of graduate studies at Barnard College; N. Katherine Hayles; James B. Duke Professor of Literature at Duke University; and Nicholas Dames, Theodore Kahan Professor of Humanities, English and Comparative Literature. Heyman Center, Second Floor Common Room. (Arts and Ideas, Data and Society)

November 6
6 – 7:30 p.m.
Mailman | Office of the Dean
Food as a Global Commodity
To connect the dots between the food system, public health, and health policy, Mark Bittman, former New York Times columnist and lecturer, hosts a weekly lecture series on the food justice movement. Featuring Timothy A. Wise, senior research fellow with the Global Development and Environment Institute’s Globalization and Sustainable Development Program at Tufts University. Participate using #FoodJustice on Twitter. RSVP here. Vagelos Education Center, Room 201. (Global Solutions, Just Societies)

For RSVP, ticket availability, and other details, follow the links. We always appreciate hearing from you about future events.

Harlem’s Ballet Trailblazer Arthur Mitchell at Columbia

There was a buzz on Broadway and 116th on Monday, October 2, as hundreds of ticket holders waited to get into Miller Theatre for an event called simply, “An informal performance on the art of dance.” An understated title, but those familiar with dancer, director, arts ambassador, and visionary Arthur Mitchell ’16HON knew the evening was bound to be extraordinary. And it was.

In 1955, Mitchell joined the New York City Ballet under the direction of George Balanchine and Lincoln Kirstein. He was the first African-American principal dancer at NYCB or any major American ballet company. Later, he founded and directed the acclaimed Dance Theatre of Harlem.  

Mitchell, a self-described “political activist through dance,” recently donated his archive to Columbia’s Rare Book and Manuscript Library. An exhibition, “Arthur Mitchell: Harlem’s Ballet Trailblazer,” will be on view at the Wallach Art Gallery at the Lenfest Center for the Arts from January 13-March 11, 2018.

As the program began, award-winning actress Cicely Tyson ’14HON described meeting her friend Mitchell in the 1950’s. At the time, he predicted they would work together someday—and here they were, both Columbia honorary degree recipients, together at the University more than 60 years later.

Mitchell remained onstage throughout the evening— in a Columbia blue leather chair— watching dancers recreate highlights from his career. He engaged the audience with anecdotes about growing up in Harlem, his choreography, his travels, and his friendships with figures like Nelson Mandela. Dancers from Alvin Ailey American Dance Theatre, American Ballet Theatre, Dance Theatre of Harlem, and the New York City Ballet had accepted Mitchell’s invitation to perform and each paid tribute, including the renowned Alicia Graf Mack ’03GS.

The evening included choreography by George Balanchine (Four Temperaments and Agon), Alvin Ailey (“Vortex” from The River), and Mitchell himself (Balm and Gilead).  

Agon, a 1957 Balanchine pas de deux, drew attention when it premiered in the pre-Civil Rights era, featuring African-American dancer Mitchell and white ballerina Diana Adams. According to Mitchell, “My skin color against hers became part of the choreography.”

The roles were danced here by ABT’s Calvin Royal III and NYCB’s Unity Phelan. According to a dance critic from Pointe, “The two dancers…gave an electric and intense performance. Afterwards, Mitchell turned to the audience and smiled, ‘I would say it’s in good hands.'”

He was talking about Agon, but the same may be said about Arthur Mitchell’s legacy, archived at Columbia for the ages.   

Tracy Quinn ’14SPS, senior director for strategic communications, first saw Arthur Mitchell dance in her hometown of Saratoga Springs, NY—the summer home of the New York City Ballet.

Jerry’s and Carolina’s Picks Oct 12 – 30 (16:58)

There’s hip-hop and justice at Lenfest, Louis Armstrong at Miller, Mark Bittman’s Food Justice series, Pulitzer writers on social struggles around the world from senses in the brain, to any sense of values in the age of Trump, migrant rights to fossil fuel accountability, you have NO chance of being bored this Columbia month. CU there! 

 

 

 

 

 

October 25
6:30 – 8 p.m.
The Committee on Global Thought | Apollo Theater
Fight the Power: A Global Conversation Exploring Hip-Hop and Social Consciousness
An exploration of hip-hop’s impact on global culture and social consciousness. Dancers from the Apollo’s International Festival, Breakin Convention, join Mamadou Diouf, professor of African Studies, to reflect on the music’s impact on their lives and the politics of its local communities. Registration required here. Lenfest Center for the Arts, The Lantern. (Arts and Ideas, Global Solutions, Just Societies)

REMINDERS

October 10: Big Data, Privacy, and Social Science Research
October 11: Coming to Terms with a Polarized Society: Polarization, Partisanship, and the Future of the Constitutional System
October 12: In Conversation with Jhumpa Lahiri ’89BC

PICKS

October 12
7 – 10 p.m.
Center for Jazz Studies | Louis Armstrong Educational Foundation, Inc.
The Armstrong Continuum
Some of the nation’s significant jazz artists play music associated with the legacy of Louis Armstrong. Includes a quartet led by Kidd Jordan, known as the dean of avant garde music in New Orleans, and the Louis Armstrong Tribute Band All Stars, led by trombonist Wycliffe Gordon. Purchase tickets here. Miller Theatre. (Arts and Ideas)

October 12
6:30 – 8:30 p.m.
Committee on Global Thought
The ‘Migration Crisis’ in Europe and the Current Global Predicament
A discussion with Sandro Mezzadra, associate professor of political theory at the University of Bologna; Etienne Balibar, visiting professor of french and romance philology; and moderated by Rosalind Morris, professor of anthropology. This event is part of the Migrancy and Unsettlement Committee on Global Thought Signature Research Project. Registration is required here. Faculty House, Presidential Room 1. (Global Solutions)

October 14
1 – 4 p.m.
Zuckerman Institute Education Lab
Saturday Science: Sensory Overload!
What are my senses? How do my sensors work? How do I interpret my world? Students, families, and community groups are invited to explore the workings of the brain through hands-on activities and demonstrations with scientists. RSVP here. 605 W. 129th St., Jerome L. Greene Science Center, Education Lab. (Future of Neuroscience)

October 17
6 – 7 p.m.
Graduate School of Journalism
Thought Leaders Series: 2017 Pulitzer Prize Panel
Three of this year’s Pulitzer Prize-winning journalists—Daniel Berehulak reporting for the New York Times from the Philippines, Sarah Ryley reporting for the Daily News from New York City, and Eric Eyre reporting from West Virginia in the Charleston Gazette-Mail—tell stories of struggle. Moderated by Sheila Coronel, director of the Toni Stabile Center for Investigative Journalism and Dean of Academic Affairs. Pulitzer Hall, Jamail Lecture Hall.

October 23
4 p.m.
Harriman Institute
Defending Universal Values in the Age of Trump
A talk with Dan Baer, former US Ambassador and current diplomat-in-residence at the University of Denver’s Josef Korbel School of International Affairs. International Affairs Building, Marshall D. Shulman Seminar Room 1219. (Just Societies)

October 23
6 – 8 p.m.
Sabin Center for Climate Change Law | Earth Institute | Union of Concerned Scientists | New York City Bar Association International Environmental Law Committee
Can Fossil Fuel Companies Be Held Liable for Climate Change?
A panel discussion with Peter Frumhoff, director of science and policy at the Union of Concerned Scientists; Sharon Eubanks, partner at Bordas and Bordas; and Gerald Torres, professor of Cornell Law School. Moderated by Michael Burger, executive director of the Sabin Center for Climate Change Law. RSVP here. Columbia Law School, Jerome Greene Hall, Room 104. (Climate Response)

October 24
6 –  8 p.m.
College of Physicians and Surgeons
DocTalks: Unraveling the Mysteries of Mind & Brain
As part of the Precision Medicine Forum series and in celebration of the 250th anniversary of P&S, a DocTalk, in which CUMC faculty share their expertise, hosted by Lee Goldman, EVP and dean of the Faculties of Health Sciences and Medicine and chief executive of CUMC. Includes a panel discussion with David B. Goldstein, director of the Institute for Genomic Medicine and Neurology; Jeffrey A. Lieberman, chairman at the department of Psychiatry; Philip De Jager, neuro-immunology specialist; and Christine Ann Denny, assistant professor of clinical neurobiology. 58 East 68th Street at Park Avenue, Harold Pratt House. (Future of Neuroscience, Precision Medicine)

October 25
8:30 a.m. – 1 p.m.
College of Physicians and Surgeons
Ninth Annual Steve Miller Medical Education Day
An annual event promoting medical education and humanism in medicine, in paying tribute to the legacy contributions of the late Steve Miller ’80CC ’84P&S, former director of pediatric emergency medicine and director of pediatric medical student education at the Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital. Featuring a grand rounds talk by Danielle Ofri, editor-in-chief of the Bellevue Literary Review. To RSVP, please e-mail Hannah Smolar at [email protected] Hammer Health Sciences Building, 701 West 168th Street, Room 401.

October 30
6 – 7:30 p.m.
Mailman | Office of the Dean
US Food Policy in the Trump Era
To connect the dots between the food system, public health, and health policy, Mark Bittman, former New York Times columnist and lecturer, is hosting a weekly lecture series on the food justice movement. This lecture features Chellie Pingree, congresswoman from Maine’s 1st Congressional District. Participate using #FoodJustice on Twitter. RSVP here. Vagelos Education Center, Room 201. (Just Societies)

For RSVP, ticket availability, and other details, follow the links. We always appreciate hearing from you about future events.

Jerry’s and Carolina’s Picks Oct 3 – 19 (16:57)

Mark Bittman to Jhumpa Lahiri, plenty of food for thought below as intellectual carbo-load for Velocity: Columbia’s Ride to End Cancer on October 7 and President Bollinger’s fun run on October 13. See you at something!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

October 9
6 – 7:30 p.m.
Mailman
Climate Change and Food Systems
To connect the dots between the food system, public health, and health policy, Mark Bittman, former New York Times columnist and lecturer, is hosting a weekly lecture series on the food justice movement. This lecture features Bill McKibben, senior advisor and co-founder of 350.org. Participate using #FoodJustice on Twitter. RSVP here. Vagelos Education Center, Room 201. (Climate Response)

REMINDERS                                                                               

October 4: Does Equality Have a Future in America?
October 6: 2017 Social Enterprise Conference – Leaders Taking a Stand: Social Impact in Turbulent Times
October 7: Lamont-Doherty Open House

PICKS

October 3
6:30 – 8 p.m.
Committee to Protect Journalists
On the Record: The State of Press Freedom
Around the world, press freedom is under threat. Journalists and lawyers will address the current challenges and the solutions we can unite behind. Includes Jameel Jaffer, executive director of the Knight First Amendment Institute; Alberto Ibargüen, president and CEO of the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation; Joel Simon, executive director of the Committee to Protect Journalists; and others. Moderated by Brian Stelter, host of CNN’s “Reliable Sources.”
Limited seats are available for the public; e-mail Megan Marcus at [email protected] to RSVP. 25 West 52 Street, The Paley Center for Media. (Data and Society, Just Societies)

October 5
12 – 1:30 p.m.
University Programs and Events | SIPA
Challenging the World to Build New Foundations of Human Solidarity
This World Leaders Forum program features an address by Jim Yong Kim, president of the World Bank Group in discussion with Michelle Fleury, BBC’s New York Business Correspondent. Introduction by Dean Merit E. Janow. Q&A with the audience to follow. Low Library, Rotunda. (Global Solutions)

October 6
6 – 9 p.m.
Graduate School of Journalism
FilmFridays: Let It Fall Los Angeles 1982–1992
Let It Fall examines a decade of tension, civil unrest, and events in Los Angeles that culminated in citywide violence following the Rodney King verdict on April 29, 1992. Screening followed by a Q&A with the filmmaker John Ridley and producer Jeanmarie Condon ’86JRN. Pulitzer Hall, Jamail Lecture Hall. (Just Societies)

October 10
6 – 7:30 p.m.
Columbia Business School
Big Data, Privacy, and Social Science Research
A talk with Seth Stephens-Davidowitz, New York Times op-ed contributor, on his new book, Everybody Lies: Big Data, New Data, and What the Internet Can Tell Us About Who We Really Are. Reception and book signing to follow. RSVP here. Uris Hall, Hepburn Lounge, 1st floor. (Data and Society)

October 11
7 – 9 p.m.
Institute for Social and Economic Research and Policy
Coming to Terms with a Polarized Society: Polarization, Partisanship, and the Future of the Constitutional System
A discussion with Nolan McCarty, Susan Dod Brown Professor of Politics and Public Affairs at Princeton University; Frank Bruni, New York Times op-ed columnist; and Frances Lee, professor of government and politics at the University of Maryland. RSVP here. Low Library, Rotunda. (Just Societies)

October 12
6:30 – 8 p.m.
Barnard College
In Conversation with Jhumpa Lahiri ’89
Jhumpa Lahiri ’89BC received the Pulitzer Prize winning writer will be joined in conversation by Hisham Matar, the Weiss International Fellow in Literature and the Arts. Pre-signed books will be available for purchase. The Diana Center, Event Oval.

October 19
4:15 – 6:15 p.m.
The Center for Science and Society | Italian Academy
Music and Meaning
A discussion with scholars from the humanities and cognitive science on the meaning of music. Welcoming remarks by David Freedberg, director of the Italian Academy, and Pamela Smith, Seth Low Professor of History and chair of the Presidential Scholars in Society and Neuroscience. Speakers include David Huron (Ohio State University); and Aniruddh D. Patel (Tufts University); and Elizabeth Tolbert (Johns Hopkins University). Moderated by Andrew Goldman, Presidential Scholar in Society and Neuroscience, and  Jacqueline Gottlieb, professor of Neuroscience. RSVP here. Italian Academy. (Future of Neuroscience)

For RSVP, ticket availability, and other details, follow the links. We always appreciate hearing from you about future events.