Monthly Archives: March 2016

Keyword Justice: Jerry’s Picks 16.12 March 31 – April 13

Just Societies is in focus in the weeks ahead.  And check out March 31! Write event stories here.

REMINDERS

April 1: Designing for Life and Death: Sustainable Disposition and Spaces of Remembrance in the 21st Century Metropolis, The EU Refugee Crisis and the Future of Europe, and Displacements: Forced Migration in the 21st Century
April 4: Feminist to the Core
April 5: The Business of Building a Pioneering Precision Medicine Initiative

PICKS 

March 31
4:30 – 6:30 p.m.
Center for the Study of Social Difference | Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Council
Keywords: Choice
An interdisciplinary examination of the word choice. Featuring Rachel Adams, director of the Center for the Study of Social Difference; Ester Fuchs, director of the urban and social policy concentration; Maya Sabatello, assistant professor of clinical bioethics; Carol Sanger, Barbara Aronstein Black Professor of Law; Josef Sorett, associate director of the Institute for Religion, Culture, and Public Life and assistant professor of religion and African-American studies. Barnard College, Altschul Hall, Lehman Auditorium. (Just Societies)

6 – 7 p.m.
Columbia School of Journalism
The Delacorte Lectures: Celebrating Victor Navasky
Victor Navasky, the George T. Delacorte Professor in Magazine Journalism and director of the Delacorte Center, will give a Delacorte Lecture on the eve of his retirement. Q&A with David Remnick, editor of The New Yorker. RSVP is required at [email protected] Pulitzer Hall, 3rd floor, World Room.

6 p.m.
GSAPP
​​Patrick Ball: Seeing the Forest
Using four databases with lists of victims of the Syrian conflict, researchers at the Human Rights Data Analysis Group have estimated the total number of people killed in Syria from 2011 to 2015. This talk will explain the estimate and what it means for quantitatively understanding conflict. RSVP to [email protected] Pulitzer Hall, Brown Institute for Media Innovation. (Data and Society, Just Societies)
 
7 p.m.
​Center for Jazz Studies
Harlem Is Nowhere Is Now Here: Locating the Lost Photographs of Ralph Ellison and Gordon Parks
Jean-Christophe Cloutier will explore the photographic history behind the writing of one of Ralph Ellison’s most influential essays, Harlem Is Nowhere (1948) and the collaboration with Gordon Parks, world-renowned photographer, that shaped each artist’s conception of black invisibility. Introductory performance by students and faculty of the Louis Armstrong Jazz Performance Program. RSVP to [email protected] Prentis Hall, Room 101.  (Public Square, Just Societies)
 
7 – 9 p.m. 
Institute for Research in African-American Studies
Politics, Black Lives Matter, and the 2016 Election
Jesse Jackson, American civil rights activist, Baptist minister, and two-time U.S. presidential candidate, and Cornel West, political intellectual and professor of philosophy and Christian practice at Union Theological Seminary will be in discussion. Moderated by Professor Keith Boykin, New York Times best-selling author, American broadcaster, and commentator.  Miller Theatre. (Just Societies)

April 6
5 – 7 p.m.
School of Professional Studies
Narrative Medicine Rounds: Rachel Aviv
Rachel Aviv, staff writer for The New Yorker, will report on the death penalty in America and euthanasia. CUMC Faculty Club, Physicians and Surgeons Building, 4th floor. (Just Societies)

April 7
9:30 a.m. – 12 p.m.
SIPA | Columbia Law School
19th Annual David N. Dinkins Leadership and Public Policy Forum
Addresses issues in urban ecosystems including mass incarceration, education, the environment, labor, tourism, immigration, and fiscal crises. Keynote address by Loretta E. Lynch, United States Attorney General, on 21st century policing and criminal justice reform. Opening remarks by President Lee C. Bollinger, Dean Merit E. Janow, and David N. Dinkins, professor of professional practice at SIPA and the 106th Mayor of the City of New York. Program agenda here. Registration required here. Alfred Lerner Hall, Auditorium. (Just Societies)

April 13​
12:10 p.m. – 1:20 p.m.
Columbia Law School |Center for Gender & Sexuality Law
Invisible No More: Racial Profiling and Police Brutality Against Women and LGBTQ People of Color
Andrea J. Ritchie, Soros Justice Fellow and co-author of Say Her Name: Resisting Police Violence Against Black Women and Queer (In)Justice: The Criminalization of LGBT People in the United States will discuss gender and sexuality specific forms of racial profiling and policing, the criminalization these instances reflect, and the broader paradigms of policing that facilitate them. Jerome Greene Hall, Case Lounge, Room 701. (Just Societies)

For RSVP, ticket availability, and other details, follow the links. We always appreciate hearing from you about future events!

 

Shō business! Jerry’s Picks 16.11 March 26 – April 11

April brings its usual (unusual) top-shelf programming, starting with Japanese music. There’s no business like shō business… Write event stories here

REMINDERS
 
March 21: Woman and City: A Conversation with Wang Anyi
March 22: Seizing Tomorrow’s Global Market Opportunities
March 23: Global Health and Health Systems
March 24: 
Sustaining Peace Conference 2016: A New Vision of Women, Peace, and Security, Launch Event: Curious Journalist’s Guide to Data, and Copy Write: The Author Survival Guide
 
PICKS

March 26
4 p.m.
Institute for Medieval Japanese Studies | Japanese Cultural Heritage Initiatives
Glories of the Japanese Music Heritage: Ancient Soundscapes Reborn
The 11th Annual Concert of Japanese Heritage Instrumental Music includes classical and contemporary works inspired by paintings and poetry. Featuring Hitomi Nakamura (hichiriki), Takeshi Sasamoto (ryūteki), Mayumi Miyata (shō), Hidejirō Honjō (shamisen), Fuyuhiko Sasaki (harp & kugo), Columbia Gagaku Instrumental Ensemble, and others. Register here. Miller Theatre.

April 1
9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Earth Institute | GSAPP | Institute for Religion, Culture, and Public Life
Designing for Life and Death: Sustainable Disposition and Spaces of Remembrance in the 21st Century Metropolis
The environmental toll of traditional burial and cremation, changing social norms, and spatial limitations within our rapidly growing cities demand alternative mortuary designs that change the way we honor our deceased. See the list of interdisciplinary speakers here. Register here. Low Library, Faculty Room.

1 – 6 p.m.
Center for Contemporary Critical Thought | Maison Française | Columbia Global Centers | Paris
The EU Refugee Crisis and the Future of Europe
An interdisciplinary discussion among lawyers, political and social scientists, and historians on refugee and asylum law and rights today. Including Alexander Aleinikoff, Huo Global Policy Initiative Research Fellow; Adam Tooze, Kathryn and Shelby Cullom Davis Professor of History; and Ayten Gundogdu, assistant professor of political science at Barnard. Moderated by Seyla Benhabib, senior scholar in residence at the Center for Contemporary Critical Thought. RSVP here. Maison Française, Buell Hall, East Gallery. (Just Societies, Global)

6:30 p.m.
GSAPP Alumni Association
Displacements: Forced Migration in the 21st Century
Panelists from the global policy, human rights, and design communities who are actively addressing challenges presented by forced migration. Featuring Jürgen Chrobog, former German diplomat; Leslie Thomas ’91GSAPP, executive and creative director of Artworks Projects; Don Weinreich ’81CC ’85GSAPP, partner at Ennead Architects. Moderated by Sean Anderson, associate curator in the department of architecture and design at the MoMA. Purchase tickets here. Three Sixty, 10 Desbrosses Street. (Global, Just Societies)

April 4
12 – 2 p.m.
Institute for Research on Women, Gender, and Sexuality
Feminist to the Core
This series features new ways of seeing the texts that are at the heart of the Columbia experience. A lecture on Karl Marx by University Professor Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak, world-renowned scholar and founding member of the Institute for Comparative Literature and Society. Maison Française, Buell Hall.

April 5
6 – 8:30 p.m.
Columbia Business School Alumni Club of New York | CBSACNY Healthcare Committee
The Business of Building a Pioneering Precision Medicine Initiative
Geneticist David Goldstein, director of the Institute for Genomic Medicine (IGM), and Tom Maniatis, director of IGM’s Precision Medicine Initiatives, will discuss IGM and its related University-wide Precision Medicine Initiative. Jon R. Cohen, senior vice president at Quest Diagnostics, will moderate. Purchase tickets here. Cooley LLC, 1114 Avenue of the Americas. (Precision Medicine)
 
April 6
6:30 – 8 p.m.
Zuckerman Institute | Stavros Niarchos Foundation Brain Insight Lecture
Learning from Experience: How Our Brains Remember the Past and Shape Our Future
Psychologist Daphna Shohamy will discuss how parts of the brain work together to support learning and what these processes mean for memory and decision-making. Graduate School of Journalism, Lecture Hall, 3rd floor. RSVP here. (Zuckerman Institute and the Future of Neuroscience)

April 8 – April 9
Heyman Center | SoA | Center for Justice | Columbia School of Journalism | IRAAS
The Wire – The Conference
Why is The Wire such an object of multi-disciplinary inquiry? How has it inspired other forms of collaboration among creators and consumers, community activists, and academics across disciplines? List of speakers and schedule here. Purchase tickets here. Teachers College, Horace Mann Hall, Cowin Center. (Public Square)

​April 11
1 – 5:30 p.m.
Center for Research on Ethical, Legal, and Social Implications of Psychiatric, Neurologic, and Behavioral Genetics
The Search for Genetic Origins of Human Behavior: Ethical, Legal, and Social Implications
Geneticists and other scholars will discuss the topic in the context of gender identity and violent behavior. Conference schedule here. To register, e-mail [email protected] by March 28. Faculty House. (Precision Medicine, Zuckerman Institute and the Future of Neuroscience)

6 p.m.
Columbia Global Reports
How to Save the Middle East
How did the world’s most tolerant region become the least harmonious place on the planet? A discussion with Nicolas Pelham, Middle East correspondent for The Economist and author of Holy Lands: Reviving Pluralism In the Middle East, and Professor Safwan M. Masri, executive vice president of the Global Centers. Moderated by Nicholas Lemann, director of Columbia Global Reports. Pulitzer Hall, World Room. (Global)
 

For RSVP, ticket availability, and other details, follow the links. We always appreciate hearing from you about future events!

Jerry’s Picks 16.10 March 21 – March 31  

OK – it’s a long list, spanning sex in the brain, data journalism, global markets, incarceration, Syrian victims, Harlem arts, and Cornel West. Read it, invite people, and remember why we work at Columbia! Write event stories here

FEATURED EVENT STORY
 

Fresh Prints: Santonocito Tours Neiman
Kiki Smith once said, “I think there’s a spiritual power in repetition, a devotional quality, like saying rosaries.” Read more here>>
 

REMINDERS
 
March 16: Community Brain Expo: A Celebration of Science and the Brain and Bill Griffith, A to Z
March 23: Global Health and Health Systems
March 24: Sustaining Peace Conference 2016: A New Vision of Women, Peace, and Security
 
PICKS
 
March 21
6 – 8 p.m.
Weatherhead East Asian Institute | Heyman Center for the Humanities | Columbia Law and multiple other sponsors
Woman and City: A Conversation with Wang Anyi
Wang Anyi, author of The Song of Everlasting Sorrow, is widely considered one of the most prominent and prolific women writers of contemporary China. A discussion moderated by Lydia H. Liu, Wun Tsun Tam Professor in the Humanities. Introduction by Eugenia Lean, director of the Weatherhead Institute. Register here. Jerome Greene Hall, Room 104.

4 – 6 p.m. 
Presidential Scholars in Neuroscience | Center for Science and Society | Department of Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies
Imag(in)ing Sex in the Brain
Feminist scholars from neuroscience, philosophy, and cultural and media studies will discuss how sex and gender appear in brain images. Speakers include , professor of humanities, media studies, and critical and visual studies at the Pratt Institute; Vanessa Bentley, doctoral candidate at the University of Cincinnati;  , scientific assistant at the Center for Interdisciplinary Women’s and Gender Studies in Technische Universität Berlin; and Gina Rippon, professor and chair of cognitive neuroimaging at the Aston Brain Centre in Aston University. Buell Hall, Maison Française. (Zuckerman Institute)

March 22
6:15 – 8 p.m.
SIPA | Richman Center | Center for Global Enterprise
Seizing Tomorrow’s Global Market Opportunities
What forces will be shaping global business? How can future leaders prepare to manage their organizations? A discussion with  , co-founder and chairman of the Center for Global Enterprise and former chairman, CEO, and president of IBM. Featuring Shelly Lazarus ’70BUS, former chairman and CEO of Ogilvy and Mather; , former undersecretary of commerce and director of the U.S. Patent and Trademark office; , president of Point72 Asset Management; and Chris Caine, president and co-founder of the Center for Global Enterprise and CEO of Mercator XXI. Moderated by Thomas Friedman, journalist and international bestselling author. Register here. Uris Hall, Room 301. (Global)

March 24
6 – 8 p.m.  
Columbia School of Journalism | Tow Center for Digital Journalism
Launch Event: Curious Journalist’s Guide to Data
The launch of a research project led by Tow Fellow Jonathan Stray. Explore where data comes from, how to analyze it, and how to communicate your results. A panel discussion with Kate Crawford, principal researcher at Microsoft Research New York City; Mark Hansen, director of the David and Helen Gurley Brown Institute for Media Innovation and professor of journalism at Columbia Journalism School; Scott Klein, assistant managing editor at ProPublica. RSVP required here. Brown Institute for Media Innovation. (Data and Society, Public Square)

6:15 p.m.
Columbia Law School | Kernochan Center for Law, Media, and the Arts
Copy Write: The Author Survival Guide
Brad Meltzer ’96LAW, bestselling author, will deliver the 29th annual Horace S. Manges Lecture. He will discuss how he uses his law degree to publish books, make TV shows, and survive rejection, including anecdotes about how Columbia Law School influenced his writing career—and which Columbia Law School professors he has hidden as characters in his books. RSVP required here. Jerome Greene Hall, Room 104.  (Public Square)

March 29
9:15 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Heyman Center for the Humanities | Center for the Study of Ethnicity and Race | Center for Justice
Mobility and Confinement: An Interdisciplinary Conference on Incarceration in America
Addresses a wide range of complex issues around mass incarceration, such as economic mobility and poverty, the detention of migrants and refugees, the regulation of drug trafficking and the war on drugs, and the war on terror. See discussants and program here. Heyman Center, Common Room, 2nd floor.  (Just Societies, Global)

​March 31
4:30 – 6:30 p.m.
Center for the Study of Social Difference | Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Council
Keywords: Choice
An interdisciplinary examination of the word “choice.” Featuring Rachel Adams, director of the Center for the Study of Social Difference; Ester Fuchs, director of Urban and Social Policy Concentration; Maya Sabatello, assistant professor of Clinical Bioethics; Carol Sanger, Barbara Aronstein Black Professor of Law; Josef Sorett, associate director of the Institute for Religion, Culture, and Public Life and assistant professor of religion and African-American studies. Barnard College, Altschul Hall, Lehman Auditorium. (Public Square)

6 p.m.
Graduate School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation
Patrick Ball: Seeing the Forest
Using four databases with lists of victims of the Syrian conflict, researchers at the Human Rights Data Analysis Group have estimated the total number of people killed in Syria from 2011 to 2015. This talk will explain how the estimate was made, how the likely true patterns of violence are substantially different from the patterns that can be observed directly, and what the difference means for quantitatively understanding the Syrian war and conflict in general. RSVP to [email protected] by March 24. Pulitzer Hall, Brown Institute for Media Innovation. (Data and Society, Just Societies)

7 p.m.
​Center for Jazz Studies
Harlem Is Nowhere Is Now Here: Locating the Lost Photographs of Ralph Ellison and Gordon Parks
Jean-Christophe Cloutier will explore the photographic history behind the writing of one of Ralph Ellison’s most influential essays Harlem Is Nowhere (1948) and the collaboration with Gordon Parks, world-renowned photographer, that shaped each artist’s conception of black invisibility. Introductory performance by students and faculty of the Louis Armstrong Jazz Performance Program. RSVP to [email protected] Prentis Hall, Room 101.  (Public Square, Just Societies)

7 – 9 p.m.
Institute for Research in African-American Studies
Jesse Jackson and Cornel West
A public discussion with Jesse Jackson, American civil rights activist, Baptist minister, and two-time U.S. presidential candidate, and Cornel West, political intellectual, professor of philosophy and Christian practice at Union Theological Seminary. Miller Theatre. (Just Societies)

For RSVP, ticket availability, and other details, follow the links. We always appreciate hearing from you about future events!

Fresh Prints: Santonocito Tours Neiman

This ambitious showcase of inverted photographs, painstakingly crafted lithographs set inside laser-engraved wood structures, spiraling electron orbits, silly putty, and color studies, delights despite its incoherence. The German-born artist, Kiki Smith, gives us a series of six etchings whose protagonist is the goat moth, an image that was inspired during her sojourn in Catskill, NY. In this set of etchings, Smith demonstrates the simple beauty of creating multiple iterations, with slight variations, of the same image. She once said, “I think there’s a spiritual power in repetition, a devotional quality, like saying rosaries.”

In Good Day kiki 1and Esperanza, Smith employs a favorite printmaking technique, etching using two acid-resistant materials, aquatint and soap ground, to create irregular, subdued tones of gold, orange, pink, and blue-purple. A clever use of holographic paper transforms the print into a collage of shimmering raindrops that does, as its title suggests, make for a good day.

Before visiting the gallery, take a moment and stop by the sixth floor of the Columbia Alumni Center to view one of Kiki Smith’s first projects at the LeRoy Neiman Center, Moon Three, a photogravure triptych of floating moons above a richly inked black background. Ankiki 2d when you’re there, please straighten out the pictures; they’re always crooked.

New Prints at the LeRoy Neiman Gallery features six artists, including Smith. The gallery is part of the LeRoy Neiman Center for Print Studies, established in 1998 with an endowment gift from LeRoy and Janet Neiman to promote printmaking through education, production and exhibition of prints. The exhibition is on view now through March 24 in Dodge Hall. Gallery hours are Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and closed on Saturday and Sunday.

Contributor: Paolo Santonocito, assistant director for the Engineering Fund, SEAS

 

Jerry’s Picks 16.9 March 9 – March 24

Manning Marable meets Vaclav Havel meets Art Spiegelman meets Nobel laureate Leymah Gbowee meets Women Ambassadors. Won’t you join them? Write event stories here

FEATURED EVENT STORY

Startup from the bottom, now the whole team here!

“Our team has realized the benefit of experiencing Columbia and learning about all the amazing things happening here. So on a rainy February 2, I along with other members of CloEve Demmer’s team made a trip to SoHo to attend the Founders Series at the Columbia Startup Lab.” Read more of Fritzie Dizon’s story here>>

REMINDERS

​March 8: New York, Global City: Recovery and Transformation Since the Great Recession and Jon Jang: The Sounds of Struggle
March 9: Open This End: Art, Ethics and Philanthropy Roundtable
March 9–12: Undrown’d: Seeking Asylum
 
PICKS

March 9
4 – 5:30 p.m.
Harriman Institute | East Central European Center | Alliance Program | Vaclav Havel Library Foundation
Havel at 80: Reflections on His Thoughts and Legacies
Opening remarks by President Lee C. Bollinger. Alex Cooley, director of the Harriman Institute; Timothy Frye, Marshall D. Shulman Professor of Post-Soviet Foreign Policy; Michael Kraus, Frederick C. Dirks Professor of Political Science at Middlebury College; Jacques Rupnik, director of research at Centre d’Etudes et de Recherches Internationales in Sciences Po; and Jan Svejnar, director of the Center on Global Economic Governance will assess the current political and economic developments in Central-East Europe. RSVP here. Italian Academy Library. (Global)
 
6 – 8 p.m.
SIPA | United Nations Studies
The Voices of Women Ambassadors on Peace and Security: Will a Woman Secretary-General Make a Difference?
To celebrate International Women’s Day, a panel of women ambassadors, includes Dina Kawar (Jordan, Member of the Security Council in 2014-2015), Raimonda Murmokaite (Lithuania, Member of the Security Council in 2014-2015), María Emma Mejía Velez (Colombia), Alya Ahmed Saif Al Thani (Qatar), and others. Elisabeth Lindenmayer, director of the United Nations Studies, will moderate. International Affairs Building, Room 1501. (Global)

March 11
6 – 8 p.m.
Rare Book and Manuscript Library | Institute for Research in African American Studies
Manning Marable: Scholar, Activist, and Mentor
A panel on the late Manning Marable, founding director of the Institute for Research in African-American Studies. Featuring Robin D. G. Kelley, Gary B. Nash Professor of American History at UCLA; Michael Eric Dyson, University Professor of sociology at Georgetown; Dana-ain Davis, University Professor of sociology at Queens College; Bill Fletcher Jr., activist and senior scholar with the Institute for Policy Studies; Zaheer Ali, oral historian at Brooklyn Historical Society. Moderated by Farah Jasmine Griffin, William B. Ransford Professor of English and Comparative Literature and African-American Studies. Followed by a viewing of the accompanying exhibition. Butler, Room 523. (Just Societies, Public Square)
 
March 16
2 – 5 p.m.
Zuckerman Institute
Community Brain Expo: A Celebration of Science and the Brain
For Brain Awareness Week, the public is invited to test, trick, and learn about their brains with demonstrations led by neuroscientists. Registration required here. New York State Psychiatric Institute, 40 Haven Avenue, Kolb Annex Lobby. (Zuckerman Institute and the Future of Neuroscience)
 
6 p.m.
Rare Book and Manuscript Library | [email protected]
Bill Griffith, A–Z
A conversation with cartoonist Bill Griffith and Art Spiegelman, a Pulitzer Prize-winning artist and illustrator. Moderated by Karen Green, librarian for ancient and medieval history at Butler. Reception to follow. Butler, Room 523. (Public Square)

March 23
4 – 5:30 p.m.
Mailman
Global Health and Health Systems
Join Dean Linda P. Fried for a Dean’s Grand Rounds with Ambassador Deborah Birx​, U.S. global AIDS coordinator and the U.S. special representative for Global Health Diplomacy. CUMC Alumni Auditorium, 630 West 168th Street, 1st floor. (Global)

March 24
5:30 p.m. 
The Earth Institute | Advanced Consortium on Cooperation, Conflict, and Complexity
Sustaining Peace Conference 2016: A New Vision of Women, Peace, and Security
Renowned scholars, thought leaders, and activists from the fields of global health, human rights, and security will explore the contributions that women bring to peace and security, discuss the challenges that women face in those processes, and envision opportunities to magnify their impact and legitimacy in the world. Keynote talk by Nobel Peace laureate Leymah Gbowee. Register here. SIPA, Kellogg Center, 15th floor. (Global)

For RSVP, ticket availability, and other details, follow the links. We always appreciate hearing from you about future events!

Startup from the bottom, now the whole team here!

On a rainy February 2, I along with other members of CloEve Demmer’s  team made a trip to SoHo to attend the Founders Series workshop featuring Jamie Hodari ’04CC at the Columbia Startup Lab. After hearing about Columbia Entrepreneurship at the last Prospect Roundtable and seeing the event opportunity featured in Jerry’s Picks, my curiosity piqued and I was inspired to learn more.

Some context: our team has realized the benefit of experiencing Columbia and knowing what new and amazing things are happening here. We have kicked off our “team field trips” at the Startup Lab. Using Jerry’s Picks as a resource for events we hope that this becomes a regular opportunity.

Prior to the workshop we were treated to a tour by Hayley Katz, coordinator for the Startup Lab. Hayley enlightened us on the Startup Labs selection process and highlighted various entrepreneurial projects that our talented Columbians are leading.

startup lab 1The energy at the lab is palpable! At 5,100 square feet with more than 40 startups from all around campus, the lab serves as a true testament to Columbia’s commitment to collaboration and to supporting the flourishing entrepreneurial community. This is the result of a unique partnership between the deans of Columbia College, the Business School, Engineering, Law, and the School of International and Public Affairs.

Jamie Hodari ’04CC, co-founder and co-CEO of Industrious, was the speaker of the nstartup lab 2ight. He shared firsthand knowledge of what it takes to make it in the startup world. Prior to Industrious, Hodari was the co-founder and CEO of Kepler, a rapidly growing experimental university that Scientific American called a “daring global experiment” to bring “top-tier instruction to the neediest parts of the planet.”

Jackie Morton attended joined us that night and shared that she “really enjoyed seeing such a cool place and hearing the presentation by such a successful young man, who tied in raising money for his ventures with fundraising for nonprofits.”

Hayley mentioned several exciting events on the horizon for Columbia Entrepreneurship, including the #StartupColumbia Festival, April 28-29, a two-day conference that highlights Columbia’s global entrepreneurship community. Read more here.

Thanks to Hayley and to Chris McGarry who helped organize the tour for our team and to all the amazing people who joined us!

The Lab welcomes the alumni and development community to learn more about the space.  If you are interested in organizing a tour or for more information, please contact Hayley Katz at [email protected].

Contributor: Fritzie Dizon, assistant director at the Office of Gift Planning