Monthly Archives: March 2017

Jerry’s and Carolina’s Picks (16:45) March 29 – April 15

Neutrinos to neurons, creating Chinatown to launching startups, Columbia considers the human and the humane, the perceptible and the possible. Remember to share your story.

REMINDERS

March 28: Book Talk – Selling the Future
March 29: Environmental Impacts on Health Disparities
March 30: Mortality Mansions and Refugees and Gender Violence: Media and the Arts
April 5: Narrative Medicine Rounds: On the Telling of Stories

SPECIAL PICK

April 13 – 14
9:30 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Columbia Entrepreneurship
#StartupColumbia and Columbia Venture Competition
Columbia-founded startups, panels discussing the latest trends in technology, and a notable keynote speaker. Complimentary tickets provided for VIP alumni. Please contact Yvette Miller at [email protected] for tickets and more information. Alfred Lerner Hall, Roone Arledge Auditorium.

PICKS

March 29
4 – 5:30 p.m.
Columbia Law School | Institute for the Study of Human Rights
Socio-economic Rights in Times of Crisis
Can human rights serve to safeguard the dignity of all people, even in times of crises? Panelists will discuss how human rights advocates can confront worrying trends and why socio-economic rights are now more important than ever, both internationally and in the United States. Includes Aoife Nolan, professor of international human rights law at the University of Nottingham; Colette Pichon Battle, executive director at the US Human Rights Network; and Ignacio Saiz, executive director of the Center for Economic and Social Rights. International Affairs Building, Room 1302. (Just Societies)

March 30
6 p.m.
Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Art Gallery
First-Year MFA Exhibition and Panel Discussion: Making Art in Times of Political Unrest
A discussion with Laura Miller ’13SOA, Yoav Horesh ’05SOA, and Leah Wolff ’11SOA. Moderated by Emily Liebert. Exhibition dates are March 25–April 8. RSVP here. The Judith Lee Stronach Center, Schermerhorn Hall.

April 4
4 – 7:30 p.m.
Columbia Precision Medicine Initiative
Practices starting a Biotech: Lessons Learned from Industry Leaders
The second in this seminar series on Best Practices Starting a Biotech: Lessons Learned from Industry Leaders with Tom Maniatis, director of the Precision Medicine Initiative, and Charles Zuker, scientific founder of the Precision Medicine Initiative. Topics include Basic Biology, Clinical Application, Pre-Clinical Development, and Intellectual Property. RSVP here. Roy And Diana Vagelos Education Center, 104 Haven Ave. (Precision Medicine)

April 11
5 p.m.
Co-sponsors here
The New York Premiere Film Screening of Light
Dance, memory, music, and poetry collide in a visual and aural landscape in Light, illuminating the lives of women who were forces in the creation of the New York Chinatown community in the early 1900s. Discussion with Tatsu Aoki, filmmaker and musician; Lenora Lee, choreographer; and Francis Wong, composer. Includes Tony Award-winning playwright and SOA faculty David Henry Hwang. Casa Hispanica. (Just Societies, Arts and Imagination)

April 13
4:15 – 6:15 p.m.
The Italian Academy | Presidential Scholars in Society and Neuroscience Program
The Human Sense of Smell
How does our brain make sense of scents and flavors? Panelists will explore the human sense of smell in its perceptual, neural, and cultural dimensions. Includes Avery Gilbert, smell scientist, entrepreneur, and author; Stuart Firestein, professor of biological sciences; and moderated by Ann-Sophie Barwich, presidential scholar in Society and Neuroscience. Italian Academy. (Future of Neuroscience)

7 p.m.
Nevis Science Center
Neutrinos are Us!
After the Big Bang, a small amount of matter has survived annihilation with antimatter, making up what remains today as our visible universe. But why? This lecture, featuring Georgia Karagiorgi, assistant professor of physics, will describe an ambitious experiment that aims to get to the bottom of one of science’s biggest mysteries. RSVP here. Science Center at Nevis Laboratories, Irvington, New York, 136 S. Broadway.

April 14 – 15
Heyman Center for the Humanities | Society of Fellows in the Humanities | Graduate School of Journalism
The Unplugged Soul: A Conference on the Podcast
An exploration of a new art form—the podcast—liberated from mass media’s customary limitations. Speakers include Devon Taylor, editor of Millennial; Christopher Lydon, host of Open Source; Rachel Zucker, host of Commonplace; and others. RSVP here. Journalism School, Common Room, 2nd floor. (Arts and Imagination)

For RSVP, ticket availability, and other details, follow the links. We always appreciate hearing from you about future events.

Jerry’s and Carolina’s Picks (16:44) March 23 – April 7

From surveilling mosques to selling the future, the daring of data to the music of mortality, a chorus of Columbia ideas in this week’s Picks.

REMINDERS

March 23: Struggling to Keep the Lights on: Understanding Why Energy Insecurity Matters for Health and Equity in the US and Keywords: Justice
March 28: Book Launch and Discussion: Making Sense of Science

SNEAK PEEK

April 7 – 9
Race, Violence, and Justice: The Need For Narrative
A narrative medicine workshop with George Yancy, author of Black Bodies, White Gazes: The Continuing Significance of Race; Mindy Fullilove, community psychiatrist, author and urban planner; Sayantani DasGupta, writer, pediatrician, and professor of narrative medicine; and Topher Sanders, investigative journalist.

PICKS

March 28
4 – 6 p.m.
SIPA | The Arnold A. Saltzman Institute of War and Peace Studies
Book Talk – Selling the Future
Ariel Colonomos, senior research fellow at the National Center for Scientific Research and research professor at Sciences Po in Paris, discusses his book, a look at  the modern marketplace of ideas where those who can predict revolution or state failure are highly sought. Moderated by Jack Snyder, Robert and Renee Belfer Professor of International Relations. International Affairs Building.

March 30
7 p.m.
Heyman Center | Program in Narrative Medicine | Barnard Center for Research on Women | School of the Arts
Mortality Mansions
Donald Hall, the 2006 US Poet Laureate, and Grammy award-winning musician Herschel Garfein present Mortality Mansions. This song cycle explores themes of love, sexuality, and bereavement in old age. In this world premiere, tenor Michael Slattery and Metropolitan Opera pianist Dimitri Dover will perform the cycle accompanied by reflections on the work by poets, musicians, and scholars. Mortality Mansions was commissioned by Sparks and Wiry Cries, which funds the creation of new art song collaborations between poets and composers. Register here. James Room, Barnard Hall.

April 5
5 – 7 p.m.
School of Professional Studies
Narrative Medicine Rounds: On the Telling of Stories
A talk by Richard M. Zaner, Stahlman Professor Emeritus at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine. Zaner’s writing focuses on human life, pursued through a philosophy of medicine, biomedical research, and ethics in clinical life. Faculty Club, P&S Building, 630 W. 168th St., 4th floor.

April 5
9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
The Data Science Institute
Data Science Day 2017
Demos and lightning talks by Columbia researchers presenting their latest work in data science. Keynote speech by Alfred Spector, CTO and head of engineering at Two Sigma, entitled Opportunities and Perils in Data Science. Purchase tickets here. Lerner Hall, Roone Arledge Auditorium. (Data and Society)

April 6 – 7
INCITE | The Mellon Interdisciplinary Fellows Program
The Fourth Annual Harriet Zuckerman Conference at the Mellon Biennial
Features panels entitled Non-Bureaucratic Logics in the Modern State, Culture, Difference and Globalization, Western Scholarship in Non-Western Lands?, Emergence of Knowledge, and Gendered Networks. Columbia Law School, Jerome Greene Hall, Annex, Room 107.

April 7  
1 p.m.
GSAPP
Cities and Climate Action: New Orleans, Rio, NYC
A discussion about the critical role that cities play in driving the agenda on climate change and the steps federal governments must take to assist them in their efforts to respond to the vast environmental, economic, and cultural impacts. Featuring Adam Freed, principal at Bloomberg Associates and former Deputy Director of NYC Mayor’s Office of Sustainability; Jeffrey Hebert, deputy mayor and chief resilience officer at the City of New Orleans; Kate Orff, associate professor and director of the Urban Design program; Rodrigo Rosa, visiting research scholar and legislative consultant at the Brazil Federal Senate; and Weiping Wu, professor and director of the Urban Planning program. Moderated by Michael Kimmelman, architecture critic at the New York Times and adjunct professor. Avery Hall, Room 114. (Climate Response, Global)

April 7
10 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Institute for Religion, Culture, and Public Life
Surveillance and the Mosque
A discussion of the methods and strategies of surveillance and its role in constructing “good Muslim/bad Muslim” stereotypes. Includes artists, academics, activists, community leaders, lawyers, journalists, targets of surveillance, and those charged with conducting said surveillance. Venue TBA. (Just Societies)

For RSVP, ticket availability, and other details, follow the links. We always appreciate hearing from you about future events.

Jerry’s and Carolina’s Picks (16:43) March 20 – 30

Pretty much just Just Societies. Remember to share your story.

REMINDERS

March 18: Saturday Science: What Makes a Sense?
March 22: Book Talk: No Friends but the Mountains

SNEAK PEAK

April 13 14
9:30 a.m. 5 p.m.
Columbia Entrepreneurship
#StartupColumbia and Columbia Venture Competition
A two-day conference that brings together the Columbia entrepreneurial community in celebration of innovation, entrepreneurship, and the creation of new ventures. Featuring Columbia-founded startups, panels discussing the latest trends in technology, and a notable keynote speaker. Purchase early bird tickets here. Find more information here. Alfred Lerner Hall, Roone Arledge Auditorium.

PICKS

March 20
5 – 6 p.m.
SIPA | Graduate School of Journalism
The Return of Strongmen: India, Turkey, and the US
What are the signs of an authoritarian leader and how should people respond? Steve Coll, dean of Columbia Journalism; Basharat Peer ’07JRN, opinion editor at the New York Times; and David Phillips, director of the Peace-building and Rights Program at Institute for the Study of Human Rights, will discuss how autocratic regimes can damage civil liberties and create chaos in communities. Moderated by Vishakha Desai, senior advisor for Global Affairs. Pulitzer Hall, World Room. (Just Societies)

March 22
4:20 – 6 p.m.
Co-sponsors here
The Constitution in the Age of Trump
Panelist will address the impact of the recent election on the constitutional dimensions and governance of the media, internet, press, national security, and human rights. Featuring Thomas Merrill, Charles Evens Hughes Professor of Law; Cristina Rodriguez, Samuel Rubin Visiting Professor of Law; Jessica Bulman-Pozen, professor of law; and Jameel Jaffer, director of the Knight First Amendment Institute. Moderated by Gillian Metzger, Stanley H. Fuld Professor of Law. Jerome Greene Hall, Room 103. (Just Societies)

March 23
4:30 p.m.
Center for the Study of Social Difference | Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Council
Keywords: Justice
An interdisciplinary examination of the word justice. Includes Mark Hatzenbuehler, co-director of the Center for the Study of Social Inequalities and Health; Kathryn Kolbert, Constance Hess Williams Director of the Athena Center for Leadership; Carla Shedd, assistant professor of sociology; and Rachel Adams, director of the Center for the Study of Social Difference. Butler Library, Room 203. (Just Societies)

6 – 7:30 p.m.
Center on Global Energy Policy’s Women in Energy Program
Struggling to Keep the Lights on: Understanding Why Energy Insecurity Matters for Health and Equity in the US
Panelists will discuss energy insecurity, including economic, physical, and behavioral-related outcomes,  and implications for policy and advocacy. Featuring Diana Hernandez, assistant professor of sociomedical sciences; Dana Bourland, vice president of the environment program at the JPB Foundation; Dana Harmon, executive director at the Texas Energy Poverty Research Institute. Pulitzer Hall, World Room.

March 28
6 – 8 p.m.
Earth Institute
Book Launch and Discussion: Making Sense of Science
Cornelia Dean, former editor of the New York Times/Science Times, talks about her recently published book, Making Sense of Science. The book aims to provide critical tools to evaluate the scientific claims and controversies that shape our lives. To register, e-mail Katherine Sullivan at kns213[email protected]. Hamilton Hall, Room 517. (Climate Response)

March 29
4 – 5:30 p.m.
Mailman
Environmental Impacts on Health Disparities
Investigating the role of the environment in chronic disease to improve population health. A Dean’s Grand Rounds with Ana Navas Acien, professor of environmental health sciences. Livestreamed here. Alumni Auditorium, Physicians & Surgeons, 630 West 168th St. (Just Societies)

March 30
4:10 – 6 p.m.
Women Creating Change | Center for the Study of Social Difference
Refugees and Gender Violence: Media and the Arts
Part of the Reframing Gendered Violence series, a two­-year initiative bringing together scholars, artists, and activists to examine broadly what constitutes gendered violence. Featuring Bikem Ekberzade, photojournalist from Turkey; Susan Meiselas, photographer at Magnum Photos; and Sarah Stillman, New Yorker writer and project director of the Global Migration Project at Columbia. Butler Library, Room 523. (Just Societies)

For RSVP, ticket availability, and other details, follow the links. We always appreciate hearing from you about future events.

Jerry’s and Carolina’s Picks (16:42) March 8 – 22

Your alumni and donor friends may want to check out the Saturday Science family event at the new Zuckerman Institute Education Lab or learn about perspectives on medicine and the self. And if you, yourself, attend something great, remember to share your story.

REMINDERS

March 6: Fact Checking with Peter Canby from The New Yorker and Voices From Inside America’s Mass System of Punishment: The Freeing Power of Higher Education
March 8: The Virtual Reality Revolution – Dawn of a New Medium

PICKS

March 8
8:30 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Columbia Business School Program for Financial Studies | Global Risk Institute | Data Science Institute
Second Annual News and Finance Conference
How does information become news in the first place? How do choices made by journalists shape the news to which markets react? Leaders from across academia, business, government, and the media explore new frontiers in the study of the dissemination of news and its influence on markets. View program details here. Reception to follow. RSVP here. Morningside Faculty House, 2nd floor. (Data and Society)

6:15 – 7:45 p.m.
European Institute | Department of History | Heyman Center for the Humanities
Empire of Things: How We Became a World of Consumers
While consumption is often portrayed as a recent American export, in fact, it is an international phenomenon with a longer and diverse history. Frank Trentmann, professor of history at Birkbeck College at the University of London,  explores our modern material world – from Renaissance Italy and late Ming China to today’s global economy.  Introduction by Sam Wetherell, lecturer in discipline in British history. The Heyman Center, Common Room, 2nd floor. (Global)

March 9
1 – 3 p.m.
Institute for Comparative Literature and Society | Center for Science and Society
Cancer Across Cultures: Defining Disease in Integrative Oncology
Can defining a disease based on its absence offer innovative forms of diagnosis and treatment? How do comparing different approaches in integrative oncology offer insight into changing conceptions of the body? Discussants include Narendra S. Bhatt, physician, researcher, and educator specializing in Ayurveda; Ting Bao, director of  Integrative Breast Oncology at Memorial Sloan Kettering; and Rishi Goyal, assistant professor in the division of emergency medicine. Fayerweather Hall, Room 513. (Future of Neuroscience)

5 – 7 p.m.
Center for Science and Society
Precision Medicine, Embodiment, Self, and Disability
Jackie Scully, executive director of the Policy, Ethics, and Life Sciences Research Centre at Newcastle University, will explore how genomic research and healthcare inform the cultural constructions of normality and disability, and ask how researchers might influence those constructions in ethically robust ways. Part of the Columbia Precision Medicine Initiative series, Precision Medicine: Ethics, Politics, and Culture. Jerome Greene Hall, Case Lounge, Room 701. (Precision Medicine)

March 18
1 – 4 p.m.
Zuckerman Institute Education Lab
Saturday Science: What Makes a Sense?
What are my senses? How do my sensors work? How do I interpret my world? Students, families, and community groups are invited to explore the workings of the brain through hands-on activities and demonstrations with scientists. RSVP here. Jerome L. Greene Science Center,  605 W. 129th St. (Future of Neuroscience)

March 22
6 – 7 p.m.
CJS Global
Book Talk: No Friends but the Mountains
A conversation with acclaimed war correspondent Judith Matloff, contributing editor to the Columbia Journalism Review, about her new book on the isolated mountain communities-from South America to the Middle East to Kashmir, Matloff reminds us that the drugs, terrorism, and instability cascading down the mountainside affect us all. RSVP here. Stabile Center. (Global, Just Societies)

For RSVP, ticket availability, and other details, follow the links. We always appreciate hearing from you about future events.