Monthly Archives: October 2016

Jerry’s Picks 16.26 October 26 – November 2

The Picks address issues on many fronts: gender, race, refugees, culture, and the US presidency. 

Write your event stories here.

REMINDERS

October 26: The US Elections Through Foreign Eyes
October 27: Isidore I. Benrubi Lecture with US Senator Sheldon Whitehouse
October 31: Global Think-in: Populisms Now

PICKS

October 26
6:30 p.m.
School of the Arts
Rebecca Solnit: City of Women
Rebecca Solnit, Mellon visiting artist and thinker, will be in conversation with Mabel O. Wilson (GSAPP) about City of Women, a feminist map from the book Nonstop Metropolis: A New York City Atlas that reimagines the New York City Subway system. Introduction by Dean Carol Becker and Timothy Donnelly, writing chair. Miller Theatre. (Just Societies)  

6 8 p.m.
Office of University Life
Reading Columbia: An Evening with Faculty Author Victor LaValle
For this inaugural event, Victor LaValle, professor and author, will discuss his latest novella, The Ballad of Black Tom, which explores themes of xenophobia and racism in 1920s New York City. Monica Miller  (Barnard, English) will moderate. Register here. Columbia Journalism School, Pulitzer Hall, World Room. (Just Societies)

October 27
2:30 6 p.m.
SIPA
Beyond Neutrality: The Humanitarian System at a Crossroads
This conference will feature two panels on Conformity, Impartiality, and Rights and Humanitarianism Between Charity and International Security. Moderated by SIPA lecturers Dirk Salomons and Susannah Friedman. It marks Salomons’ retirement and his contributions to the humanitarian policy field. See list of speakers here. Reception to follow. SIPA Kellogg’s Center, 15th floor. (Global Solutions, Just Societies)

6 7 p.m.
SIPA
Jake Sullivan, Hillary Clinton’s Senior Policy Advisor in conversation with Dean Merit E. Janow
How would a Clinton administration approach US relations with Russia, China, and the Middle East? What would be its priorities in the first 100 days? Jake Sullivan, an American policymaker and the top foreign policy advisor to Hillary Clinton’s 2016 election campaign, will discuss some of the global challenges that will face the next US president. Italian Academy, Teatro. (Global)

November 1
6  7 p.m.
Columbia Journalism School
Thought Leader Series: Jelani Cobb on Race and the Presidency
Jelani Cobb, New Yorker author and newly arrived Ira A. Lipman Professor of Journalism, discusses the current political scene and race at the end of the Obama era. Pulitzer Hall, Lecture Hall. (Just Societies)

November 2
5 7 p.m.
School of Professional Studies
Narrative Medicine Rounds: John Donvan and Caren Zucker
John Donvan, Emmy award–winning correspondent, and Caren Zucker, peabody Award–winning television news producer, will talk about their new book A Different Key: The Story of Autism and the seminal moments in the history of autism. CUMC Faculty Club, Physicians and Surgeons Building, 4th floor.

6 8 p.m.
SIPA
Domestic Policy in the 2016 Presidential Election: What’s at Stake?
Columbia experts will reflect on the stakes of the election from the perspectives of criminal justice, energy, education, social welfare, and urban policy, and what Clinton and Trump administrations might do differently in each of these domains. Opening remarks by Dean Merit E. Janow. Moderated by Alexander Hertel-Fernandez (SIPA). International Affairs Building, Room 1501. (Just Societies)

ONGOING

October 13 – October 28: Filming at the Borders: Migrating to Europe Today (Film Series at Maison Française)
September 7 – December 10: The Expanded Subject: New Perspectives in Photographic Portraiture from Africa (Wallach Gallery)

For RSVP, ticket availability, and other details, follow the links. We always appreciate hearing from you about future events!

Jerry’s Picks 16.25 October 19 – 31

October’s calendar brims…we just couldn’t be that picky. So here’s a thinker’s dozen. Feed your head or fuel up for the October 21 fun run with President Bollinger. In corpore sano and all that….

Write your event stories here.

REMINDERS

October 17: Global Perspectives on the U.S. Presidential Election (livestream available here)
October 19: Lessons of Climate Resilience in New York City

PICKS

October 19
6:30 p.m.
Columbia Journal of Race and Law | Columbia Journal of Environmental Law
Environmental Justice: What’s Race Got to Do With It?
Panelists will discuss a range of issues related to water accessibility and the disproportionate siting of environmental hazards in communities of color across the nation. Includes Edward Lloyd, Evan M. Frankel Clinical Professor in Environmental Law; Steven McSloy, partner at Carter Ledyard & Milburn LLP; and Kendall Thomas, director of the Center for the Study of Law and Culture. Columbia Law School, Room 103. (Climate Response, Just Societies)

6:30 p.m.
Co-sponsors here
My City Book Club: A History of Housing in New York City
Richard Plunz, director of the Urban Design Lab, will discuss his landmark study, A History of Housing in New York City. He will be joined in conversation by David Burney (Pratt Institute School of Architecture) and Shola Olatoye (New York City Housing Authority). Reception and book signing to follow. Purchase tickets here. Museum of the City of New York.

October 20
6 – 8 p.m.
Oral History Master of Arts
Intersection | Prospect Heights: Dialogue in the Supermarket
How do we talk about, argue about, and even laugh and cry about gentrification? Gabrielle Bendiner-Viani will discuss her most recent public art and dialogue project in Prospect Heights, in which exhibitions were curated at the supermarket to encourage conversations around gentrification. Knox Hall, Room 509.

October 21
8:30 a.m. – 1 p.m.
College of Physicians and Surgeons
CUMC Eighth Annual Steve Miller Medical Education Day
An annual event promoting medical education and humanism in medicine, paying tribute to the legacy of the late Steve Miller ’80CC, ’84P&S, former director of pediatric emergency medicine and director of pediatric medical student education. Featuring a grand rounds talk by Sheri Fink, Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter. For more information or to RSVP, please contact Ashley Elich at [email protected] CUMC Alumni Auditorium, 1st floor.

1 – 2 p.m.
Columbia Data Science Institute | Department of Biomedical Informatics
Paul D. Clayton Lecture: DJ Patil, The White House Chief Data Scientist
DJ Patil, deputy chief technology officer for data policy and chief data scientist in the Office of Science and Technology Policy, will answer questions about President Obama’s Data Science Initiative and its articulation with precision medicine. Roy And Diana Vagelos Education Center, Wu Auditorium. (Data and Society, Precision Medicine)

2 – 5:30 p.m.
The Italian Academy | Office of the Dean of Humanities in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences | Public Books | Office of the President
The Global Book Review
Editors and critics from around the world will discuss how the Internet has—and has not—created a global readership. Keynote by James Wood, staff writer and book critic at The New Yorker. RSVP here. The Italian Academy. (Global)

1 – 6 p.m.
The Walther Collection | Department of Art History and Archaeology | Wallach Art Gallery
Beyond the Frame: Contemporary Photography from Africa and the Diaspora
International scholars, curators, artists, and cultural producers will be in discussion. View program and speakers here. Followed by a reception at the Wallach Art Gallery, which will be open for viewing The Expanded Subject: New Perspectives in Photographic Portraiture from Africa. Register here. Schermerhorn Hall, Room 501.

8 p.m.
Astronomy Department
Surviving the Age of Misinformation
Marking the the 25th anniversary of the first World Wide Webpage, David J. Helfand will discuss the origin of misinformation and illustrate how to survive in the misinformation age. The lecture includes a Q&A session, astrophotography slideshows, and an observatory tour, followed by guided stargazing with telescopes (weather permitting). Pupin Hall. (Data and Society)

October 25
10:30 a.m. – 12 p.m.
Mailman | The Paley Center for Media
Calderone Prize in Public Health Lecture
This year’s prize will be awarded to Mary Bassett, commissioner of New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. Bassett currently leads a comprehensive strategic plan to address how New York City will contain the global outbreak of the Zika virus. Reception starts at 10:30 a.m. The Paley Center for Media, 25 West 52nd Street.

October 26
6 – 7:30 p.m.
European Institute | Columbia Journalism School
The U.S. Elections Through Foreign Eyes
What is it like to cover the U.S. presidential race? How do foreign correspondents explain our political system to the rest of the world? A discussion with Dame Babou (African Time Radio), Matthew Bishop, (The Economist); Maria Cristina Ramirez (La Prensa Panama); Weifeng Ni (BBC). International Affairs Building, Room 1512. (Global)

October 27
4 – 5 p.m.
Center for History and Ethics in Public Healthcare
Isidore I. Benrubi Lecture with U.S. Senator Sheldon Whitehouse
Whitehouse will give a lecture entitled Manufacturing Doubt: The Industry Playbook for Undermining Science and Thwarting Regulation. Reception to follow. Register here. CUMC Alumni Auditorium, 650 West 168th Street, Black Building. Private dinner at 6 p.m. at the CUMC Faculty Club. RSVP to dinner here [email protected]

October 31
6:30 – 8 p.m.
The Committee on Global Thought
Global Think-in: Populisms Now
A global think-in about populism with John Judis, editor-at-large at Talking Points Memo, on the U.S; Federico Finchelstein, professor of history at the New School, on Latin America; Xiaobo Lü, professor of political science at Barnard College, on China; Nadia Urbinati, professor of political theory, on Europe; and Lawrence Liang, co-founder of Alternate Law Forum. Moderated by Carol Gluck, chair of the Committee on Global Thought. Register here. Columbia Journalism School, Pulitzer Hall, Lecture Hall. (Global)

ONGOING

October 13 – October 28: Filming at the Borders: Migrating to Europe Today (Film Series at Maison Française)
September 7 – December 10: The Expanded Subject: New Perspectives in Photographic Portraiture from Africa (Wallach Gallery)

For RSVP, ticket availability, and other details, follow the links. We always appreciate hearing from you about future events!

 

Jerry’s Picks 16.24  October 11 – 19

Climate in NY urban design and at the White House, free choice and neuroscience, global perspectives on refugees, the US election, and thoughts on investment bubbles from the new Zhang Professor of Economics. What’s on Columbia minds? Lots! Be like Adeline, and write your event stories here.

FEATURED EVENT STORY

Adeline Ortiz Reports on the Latino Vote Event
“Despite our growing population and economic power, Latinos continue to be largely ignored by political candidates, including our current Presidential candidates, who see immigration as the only issue that concerns us.” Read more here>>

REMINDERS

October 11: Pulitzer Winners: Exposing Injustices Around the World
October 13: Precision Medicine: Ethics, Politics, and Culture and Person Place Thing Podcast

GLOBAL SERIES
Over the next two weeks, Columbia Global Centers are offering programs in New York that share unique regional perspectives on topical issues. RSVP required. The first three:  

October 13: Strengthening Refugee Access, Equity, and Inclusion: Developing a New Framework
October 17: Global Perspectives on the U.S. Presidential Election
October 18: Student Engagement at the Columbia Global Centers

PICKS

October 11
9:45 11 a.m.
Center on Global Energy Policy
Brian Deese, Senior Advisor to President Obama
A discussion of President Obama’s climate agenda and the future of the Paris Agreement. Following Deese’s remarks, Jason Bordoff, director of the Center on Global Energy Policy, will moderate a discussion. Registration is required here. Faculty House. (Climate Response)

October 13
6 8 p.m.
Center for Science and Society | Presidential Scholars in Society and Neuroscience Program
The Idea of Freedom of Choice in Neuroscience and History
Neuroscientists and behavioral economists have been collecting evidence that the human brain is often quite poor at making choices. Where does this leave us, in an age when choice has become a proxy for freedom? Sophia Rosenfeld (Yale); Sheena Iyengaar (Columbia Business School); and David Barack (Columbia presidential scholar) will be in discussion. Fayerweather Hall, Room 513. (The Future of Neuroscience)

October 19
6 – 7:15 p.m.
Earth Institute | MPA-ESP Program
Lessons of Climate Resilience in New York City
Steven Cohen, executive director of the Earth Institute; Curtis Cravens, senior advisor for coastal resiliency at the New York City mayor’s office of recovery and resiliency; George Deodatis, chair of the department of civil engineering and engineering mechanics; Kate Orff, director of the urban design program; and Adam Sobel, professor of earth and environmental sciences will discuss how New York City – and other cities like it – can take steps to become stronger and more resilient in the face of climate change. See full list of speakers here. Reception to follow. Low Library, Rotunda. (Climate Response)

October 19
6 p.m.
Faculty of Arts and Sciences
Zhang Professorship Inaugural Lecture: “Bubbles in Assets and in Art”
Celebrate the establishment of the Charles and Lynn Zhang Professorship of Economics with a lecture by its first incumbent José A. Scheinkman. Hosted by David B. Madigan; Dean James J. Valentini, and Economics Chair Donald Davis. RSVP by Wednesday, October 12, to Maryellen Titani at [email protected] The Italian Academy.

ONGOING

October 13 – October 28: Filming at the Borders: Migrating to Europe Today (Film Series at Maison Française)
September 7 – December 10: The Expanded Subject: New Perspectives in Photographic Portraiture from Africa (Wallach Gallery)
September 13 – June 2017: Tomo Mori: Concierto Encircling (Wallach Gallery/Miller Theatre)

For RSVP, ticket availability, and other details, follow the links. We always appreciate hearing from you about future events!

Adeline Ortiz Reports on the Latino Vote Event

On September 29, I attended the Battle for the Latino Vote conference co-hosted by Columbia’s Graduate School of Journalism and NBC’s Telemundo Network.  The event included a variety of panelists, ending with a discussion with Chuck Todd, moderator of Meet the Press, as he fielded questions from Ed O’Keefe, reporter at The Washington Post, and the audience about this historic election.

The discussion confirmed what I, as a Latina, have always known: despite our growing population and economic power, Latinos continue to be largely ignored by political candidates, including our current Presidential candidates, who see immigration as the only issue that concerns us.

Statistics, including those provided at the event by Mark Hugo Lopez, director of Hispanic research at the Pew Research Center, continue to show a low voter turnout among Latinos. This is a major issue leading to our invisibility in politics and our lack of influence in pushing for more inclusive agendas. Despite the statistics, Latinos tend to have very strong opinions about political candidates and socioeconomic issues that affect their lives.

It can be said that Latinos are to blame for the lack of political influence.  However, there are greater powers at play in erasing their presence. As highlighted by Chuck Todd, redistricting is an important issue that must be addressed, since there are many U.S. communities where Republicans have “drawn out” Latinos from the districts; literally, the boundaries of districts were drawn to isolate Latinos.

A further discussion of Latinos in the U.S. juggled with describing them as either conservative Republicans or Democrats – proving how miserable of a job both parties have done in reaching Latinos and understanding their values. Latinos tend to uphold strong religious values that may align better with the positions taken by Republican candidates (i.e.  on abortion); however, they are less fiscally conservative. Further, Democrats may portray a sense of financial security for Latinos that may be appealing given communities’ historical levels of poverty.  As more Latinos are born in the U.S., they will eventually drive the growth of markets (with their money) and rise in political influence. But first, they have to vote!

Jerry’s Picks 16.23 October 8 – October 13  

Tour a lab, “radioactive” with WKCR, join a live studio audience for a podcast, or explore precision medicine or mass incarceration – Pick your own Columbia adventure. Details below.

Write your event stories here.

REMINDERS

October 5: Narratives in the Body: Why One Story and Not Another?

PICKS

October 8
10 a.m. – 4 p.m.
Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory
Open House: Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory
Tour a lab, participate in hands-on earth science demonstrations, and learn from world-renowned researchers about their latest discoveries. Free and open to all. Register here. 61 Route 9W, Palisades, New York, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory.

October 9
6 p.m.
Miller Theatre
WKCR’s 75th Anniversary Concert
Celebrate the 75th anniversary of WKCR-FM, Columbia’s non-commercial student-run radio station. Featuring performances by Henry Grimes and the George Coleman quartet, including George Coleman (tenor sax), George Coleman, Jr. (drums), Rick Germanson (piano), and John Webber (bass). Purchase tickets here. Miller Theatre.

October 10
6:15 – 8:15 p.m.
Center for Justice | Center for the Study of Law and Culture | Heyman Center for the Humanities | Center for Contemporary Critical Thought
Invisible Men: Panel Discussion Celebrating Flores Forbes’ new book
Flores Forbes, associate vice president for strategic policy and program implementation and a former leader in the Black Panther Party, will read from his new book Invisible Men: A Contemporary Slave Narrative in the Era of Mass Incarceration. Including a discussion with Kendall Thomas, director of the Center for the Study of Law and Culture, and Glenn E. Martin, criminal justice reform advocate. Jerome Greene Hall, Room 103. (Just Societies)

6 – 7 p.m.
Columbia Journalism School
Pulitzer Winners: Exposing Injustices Around the World
Featuring Sheila Coronel, director of the Toni Stabile Center for Investigative Journalism; Alissa Rubin of the New York Times, who gave voice to Afghan women forced to endure unspeakable cruelties; and Yannis Behrakis, Reuters’ chief photographer for Greece and Cyprus, part of the Pulitzer-Prize winning team documenting the flight of refugees from Syria. Pulitzer Hall, Lecture Hall. (Global, Just Societies)

October 13
5 – 7 p.m.
Center for the Study of Social Difference | Center for Science and Society
Precision Medicine: Ethics, Politics, and Culture
Under the Precision Medicine Initiative, Columbia explores questions that precision medicine raises in law, ethics, the social sciences, and the humanities. Aditya Bharadwaj (The Graduate Institute, Geneva) will discuss the local and global dimensions of precision medicine. Schermerhorn Hall Extension, Room 754. (Precision Medicine, Global)

6 – 7:30 p.m.
CUMC Office of the Dean
Person Place Thing Podcast
A live taping of WAMC Public Radio’s Person Place Thing podcast with Randy Cohen, host and author of The Ethicist column in the New York Times Magazine from 1999 to 2011. Featuring Jonathan F.P. Rose, urban renewal pioneer and developer, discussing his new book The Well-Tempered City: What Modern Science, Ancient Civilizations, and Human Nature Teach Us About the Future of Urban Life. Music by classical guitarist João Kouyoumdjian. Followed by a book signing with Rose. RSVP here. CUMC, Allan Rosenfield Building, Hess Commons.

ONGOING

October 13 – October 28: Filming at the Borders: Migrating to Europe Today (Film Series at Maison Française)
September 7 – December 10: The Expanded Subject: New Perspectives in Photographic Portraiture from Africa (Wallach Gallery)
September 13 – June 2017: Tomo Mori: Concierto Encircling (Wallach Gallery/Miller Theatre)

For RSVP, ticket availability, and other details, follow the links. We always appreciate hearing from you about future events!