Current Group Members

 shaman_photoJeffrey Shaman

Professor 
Department of Environmental Health Sciences 
Director of the Climate and Health Program 
Mailman School of Public Health 
Columbia University
[email protected]

Links: CV, Faculty Webpage, Climate and Health Program, EHS, Earth Institute, IRI, CEHNM, Mailman, Infectious Disease Forecasts

My background is in climate, atmospheric science and hydrology, as well as biology. I study the environmental determinants of infectious disease transmission. In particular, I investigate how atmospheric conditions impact the survival, transmission and seasonality of pathogens and how hydrologic variability affects mosquito ecology and mosquito-borne disease transmission. More broadly I am interested in how meteorology affects human health. I am now working to develop systems to forecast infectious disease outbreaks at a range of time scales. In addition, I study a number of climate phenomena, including Rossby wave dynamics, atmospheric jet waveguides, the coupled South Asian monsoon-ENSO system, extratropical precipitation, and tropical cyclogenesis.

Jaime Cascante Vega

Staff Scientist
Department of Environmental Health Sciences 
Mailman School of Public Health 
Columbia University
[email protected]

Jaime is Colombian and received his MSc and BSc from the Biomedical Engineering Department from Universidad de los Andes. His research interests lie in the intersection with mathematical modelling as a tool for understanding complex ecological and epidemiological phenomena and deep learning and statistical techniques as a tool for extracting hierarchical features of different data-sources and infer key parameters of the models. At Columbia University, he is working on understanding the time-space spread on antimicrobial resistant (AR) pathogens, specifically of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) using mathematical models combined with inference to better prevent, control, and forecast this healthcare associated infections (HAIs). He will also help in the simulation and forecast of the spread of SARS-CoV2 at population scales.

foto_martaMarta Galanti

Post-Doctoral Research Scientist
Department of Environmental Health Sciences 
Mailman School of Public Health 
Columbia University
[email protected]

Marta Galanti completed her PhD research in Complex Systems and Mathematical Physics in a shared program between University of Florence (Italy) and University of Orléans (France). Her previous research focused on the analysis of diffusion-reaction processes in biological and industrial media in non-ideal conditions (complex geometries and crowded environments). At Columbia, she is working on developing mathematical models to generate predictions and advance the understanding and forecast of infections. One of the goals of her research will be to study respiratory virus transmission with the aim of incorporating antigenic information of rapidly evolving viruses into real-time forecasts of influenza.

Emma Gorin

Doctoral Candidate
Department of Environmental Health Sciences 
Mailman School of Public Health 
Columbia University
[email protected]

Emma Gorin began her PhD in the fall of 2020. She grew up in New York City and received an MSPH in Global Disease Epidemiology and Control from Johns Hopkins University in 2019, where her research included investigating sanitation availability in northern India and mobility among female sex workers in Guinea-Bissau. She also spent a semester in Cameroon working on implementation research and programming for key populations at risk for HIV. Prior to starting her master’s program, she worked in health education, clinical research, and international non-profit settings. Emma is interested in infectious disease dynamics and, while at Columbia, hopes to apply mathematical modelling methods to issues of emerging infectious diseases.

Stephen Lewandowski

Doctoral Candidate 
Department of Environmental Health Sciences 
Mailman School of Public Health 
Columbia University
[email protected]

Stephen began his PhD in the fall of 2017. Originally from Ohio, he received a BS in Environmental Science from the United States Military Academy in 2002 and a commission in the U.S. Army as a Medical Service Corps officer. In 2011, he completed a Master’s degree in Environmental Health at Harvard School of Public Health with an emphasis on exposure science, epidemiology, and risk assessment. At Columbia, Stephen is interested in assessing environmental hazards that impact human health, focusing on urban populations and exposures encountered during military service.

Victoria Lynch

Doctoral Candidate 
Department of Environmental Health Sciences 
Mailman School of Public Health 
Columbia University
[email protected]

Tory received her MPH in epidemiology of microbial disease from the Yale School of Public Health and her bachelor’s in environmental biology from Georgetown University. Her master’s research focused on the association between seasonal climatic factors and typhoid fever. At Mailman, she hopes to study how extreme climatic events influence the spread of water-borne infectious diseases.

haruka_head_shotHaruka Morita

Research Associate 
Department of Environmental Health Sciences 
Mailman School of Public Health 
Columbia University
[email protected]

Links: Research Gate Publications

Haruka Morita received her MPH from the Mailman School of Public Health and her BS in Biology from Lehigh University. She is interested in health impacts of various climate change events, and her most recent work includes a health impact assessment on cardiopulmonary outcomes due global PM2.5 pollution from the aviation sector (manuscript submitted). With Dr. Shaman, she is currently working on a project studying influenza and other cold virus viability in NYC subways, as well as a health assessment on indoor temperature and humidity conditions in NYC apartments.

Tal Robin

Postdoctoral Research Scientist 
Department of Environmental Health Sciences 
Mailman School of Public Health 
Columbia University
[email protected]

Tal received his Ph.D. from the Department of Physical Chemistry at Tel-Aviv University for his work on stochastic approaches to the analysis of kinetic schemes. His previous work included models of enzymatic reactions, adhesion, and pollination with emphasis on intuitive modeling. His main interests are stochastic processes, agent-based modeling, and statistical inference. At Columbia, Tal is working on a network-based model of antimicrobial-resistant pathogens spreading within hospitals in an effort to extract accurate estimations of model parameters and identifying individuals with increased risk. This work’s aim is to advance knowledge about specific infections as well as the methods themselves.

TYTeresa Yamana

Associate Research Scientist
Department of Environmental Health Sciences
Mailman School of Public Health
Columbia University
[email protected]

Links: Research Gate Publications

Teresa completed her PhD in hydrology at MIT in the department of Civil and Environmental Engineering. Her research interests lie at the intersection of environment and infectious disease, with a focus on vector-borne disease.  Her doctoral research explored the relationships between climate, entomology, and malaria transmission in West Africa using a framework of detailed mechanistic modeling.  This framework was used to assess the impacts of climate change on malaria transmission.  At Columbia, she is developing transmission models for dengue and other vector-borne diseases to be used in conjunction with data assimilation methods to generate ensemble-based forecasts of disease outbreaks.