Current Group Members

 shaman_photoJeffrey Shaman

Associate Professor 
Department of Environmental Health Sciences 
Director of the Climate and Health Program 
Mailman School of Public Health 
Columbia University
jls106@cumc.columbia.edu

Links: CV, Faculty Webpage, Climate and Health Program, EHS, Earth Institute, IRI, CEHNM, Mailman, Infectious Disease Forecasts

My background is in climate, atmospheric science and hydrology, as well as biology. I study the environmental determinants of infectious disease transmission. In particular, I investigate how atmospheric conditions impact the survival, transmission and seasonality of pathogens and how hydrologic variability affects mosquito ecology and mosquito-borne disease transmission. More broadly I am interested in how meteorology affects human health. I am now working to develop systems to forecast infectious disease outbreaks at a range of time scales. In addition, I study a number of climate phenomena, including Rossby wave dynamics, atmospheric jet waveguides, the coupled South Asian monsoon-ENSO system, extratropical precipitation, and tropical cyclogenesis.

zachary_burtZachary Burt

Post-Doctoral Fellow
Department of Environmental Health Sciences 
Mailman School of Public Health 
Columbia University
zb2119@cumc.columbia.edu

Zachary Burt earned his PhD at the Energy and Resources Group at the University of California, Berkeley in 2015. He is interested in the techno-social systems which manufacture and allocate risk, and how these play out in the water and sanitation systems of low, middle and high income countries. He has researched the costs and benefits of urban water service improvements, willingness to pay for household water treatment and gender inequities in sanitation access. He has conducted field research in India, Tanzania, and Kenya, and assessed urban water policies in California, India and Kenya. At Columbia, Zach researches efficient, effective and equitable ways of incorporating climate risk into urban water management policy in low income countries, especially focusing on water and sanitation access for marginalized groups.

foto_martaMarta Galanti

Post-Doctoral Research Scientist
Department of Environmental Health Sciences 
Mailman School of Public Health 
Columbia University
mg3822@cumc.columbia.edu

Marta Galanti completed her PhD research in Complex Systems and Mathematical Physics in a shared program between University of Florence (Italy) and University of Orléans (France). Her previous research focused on the analysis of diffusion-reaction processes in biological and industrial media in non-ideal conditions (complex geometries and crowded environments). At Columbia, she is working on developing mathematical models to generate predictions and advance the understanding and forecast of infections. One of the goals of her research will be to study respiratory virus transmission with the aim of incorporating antigenic information of rapidly evolving viruses into real-time forecasts of influenza.

alex_heaneyAlex Heaney

Doctoral Candidate 
Department of Environmental Health Sciences 
Mailman School of Public Health 
Columbia University
akh2148@cumc.columbia.edu

Alex Heaney, from Portola Valley, California, studied human biology with a focus on climate change and global health at Stanford University. Her previous research projects focused on the health impacts of climate driven migration in Tanzania, and the impacts of climate change on the global distribution of H5N1 influenza. At Columbia, she looks forward to continuing these research projects, while also exploring other ways in which climate change will influence human health.

KramerSarah Kramer

Doctoral Candidate 
Department of Environmental Health Sciences 
Mailman School of Public Health 
Columbia University
sck2165@cumc.columbia.edu

Sarah Kramer received her bachelor’s degree in Biology of Global Health from Georgetown University in 2014.  She then worked for one year as a Fulbright scholar at the Robert Koch Institute in Berlin Germany. Previous projects have included the use of contact network models to assess influenza control measures, and the use of statistical models to assess determinants of HIV risk behavior. As a Columbia student, Sarah hopes to expand on her previous experience by considering the role that the environment plays in the spread of infectious diseases.

Stephen Lewandowski

Doctoral Candidate 
Department of Environmental Health Sciences 
Mailman School of Public Health 
Columbia University
sal2222@cumc.columbia.edu

Stephen began his PhD in the fall of 2017. Originally from Ohio, he received a BS in Environmental Science from the United States Military Academy in 2002 and a commission in the U.S. Army as a Medical Service Corps officer. In 2011, he completed a Master’s degree in Environmental Health at Harvard School of Public Health with an emphasis on exposure science, epidemiology, and risk assessment. At Columbia, Stephen is interested in assessing environmental hazards that impact human health, focusing on urban populations and exposures encountered during military service.

Victoria Lynch

Doctoral Candidate 
Department of Environmental Health Sciences 
Mailman School of Public Health 
Columbia University
vdl2103@cumc.columbia.edu

Tory received her MPH in epidemiology of microbial disease from the Yale School of Public Health and her bachelor’s in environmental biology from Georgetown University. Her master’s research focused on the association between seasonal climatic factors and typhoid fever. At Mailman, she hopes to study how extreme climatic events influence the spread of water-borne infectious diseases.

haruka_head_shotHaruka Morita

Research Assistant 
Department of Environmental Health Sciences 
Mailman School of Public Health 
Columbia University
hm2487@cumc.columbia.edu

Links: Research Gate Publications

Haruka Morita received her MPH from the Mailman School of Public Health and her BS in Biology from Lehigh University. She is interested in health impacts of various climate change events, and her most recent work includes a health impact assessment on cardiopulmonary outcomes due global PM2.5 pollution from the aviation sector (manuscript submitted). With Dr. Shaman, she is currently working on a project studying influenza and other cold virus viability in NYC subways, as well as a health assessment on indoor temperature and humidity conditions in NYC apartments.

senpei_headshotSen Pei

Post-doctoral Research Scientist 
Department of Environmental Health Sciences 
Mailman School of Public Health 
Columbia University
sp3449@cumc.columbia.edu

Links: Research Gate Publications

Sen Pei received his PhD degree in Mathematics from Beihang University (Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics) in Beijing, China. His previous research focused on the modeling and empirical study of spreading dynamics in social networks, including information propagation and outbreaks of infectious diseases. At Columbia, he is  examining the predictability of the nonlinear dynamics of influenza spreading and developing skillful ensemble-based prediction systems for infectious diseases.

Brittany Shea

Project Director
Global Consortium on Climate and Health Education Department of Environmental Health Sciences 
Mailman School of Public Health 
Columbia University
bes2161@cumc.columbia.edu

Brittany Shea is the Project Director for the Global Consortium on Climate and Health Education (GCCHE) at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health. Brittany received a master’s degree in Sustainability and Environmental Management from Harvard University where she completed her master’s thesis on water quality issues associated with hydraulic fracturing, and a bachelor’s degree from Boston University.  Before starting at the GCCHE, Brittany was a Project Coordinator for the Columbia Center for Children’s Environmental Health. She has also worked at Harvard University’s David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies in Santiago, Chile on strategy and development projects, and as a Research Associate at Harvard Business School, focusing on corporate accountability, sustainability, and leadership research.

Minhaz Ud-Dean

Post-Doctoral Research Scientist 
Department of Environmental Health Sciences 
Mailman School of Public Health 
Columbia University
su2215@cumc.columbia.edu

Minhaz studied Biotechnology at University of Dhaka. There he developed a biophysical model for the stability of airborne virus. Later he completed an Erasmus Mundus joint masters program at Delft University of Technology and at University of Jena. His doctorate was in chemical engineering on inferability and inference of gene regulatory networks at ETH Zurich. Further, he contributed to the interpretation and standardization of metabolomics data at Tuebingen University. At Columbia, Minhaz is developing multi-factorial models for transmission of airborne virus.

biopage-israelIsrael Ukawuba

Doctoral Candidate
Department of Environmental Health Sciences
Mailman School of Public Health
Columbia University
iu2140@cumc.columbia.edu

Israel received a Bachelors degree in Biology from Oberlin College and an MPH degree from Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health.  He is interested in studying infectious disease modeling, in particular, vector-borne infectious disease modeling.  Previously, he worked on using climatologically-driven vectorial capacity to describe and examine malaria transmission in sub-Saharan Africa. Currently, he plans on studying the effects of local meteorology and hydrology on vector population density, survival and transmission of vector-borne pathogens.

TYTeresa Yamana

Post-Doctoral Research Scientist
Department of Environmental Health Sciences
Mailman School of Public Health
Columbia University
tky2104@cumc.columbia.edu

Links: Research Gate Publications

Teresa completed her PhD in hydrology at MIT in the department of Civil and Environmental Engineering. Her research interests lie at the intersection of environment and infectious disease, with a focus on vector-borne disease.  Her doctoral research explored the relationships between climate, entomology, and malaria transmission in West Africa using a framework of detailed mechanistic modeling.  This framework was used to assess the impacts of climate change on malaria transmission.  At Columbia, she is developing transmission models for dengue and other vector-borne diseases to be used in conjunction with data assimilation methods to generate ensemble-based forecasts of disease outbreaks.