New SIPA Student Photo Series #4

July 24th, 2014 by Columbia SIPA

Our newest photographs submission comes from Adriana Popa, an incoming SIPA student (MIA 2016).

Originally from Romania, Adriana has lived, worked and studied on three continents and graduated with High Honors from Swarthmore College.  Upon graduation, she was awarded a Davis Project for Peace grant in India, where she worked for the summer of 2012. Currently residing in New York City, and working for the Global Institute at KKR, she is buying her time in the “real world” before returning to academia.

Diving the Reef Barrier in Belize

Diving the Reef Barrier in Belize

At the Lamanai Mayan ruins in Belize

At the Lamanai Mayan ruins in Belize

Skydiving over Long Island

Skydiving over Long Island

Flying over Fire Island

Flying over Fire Island

Seeple Snapshot: Dariela Sosa

July 23rd, 2014 by Columbia SIPA

Students__Dariela Sosa

The Journalist: Dariela Sosa

Age: 28
Nationality: Venezuela
Program: MPA 2014

 

Snow can be seen out the window falling over Manhattan, as Dariela Sosa addresses her tens of thousands of listeners in Caribbean-bathed Venezuela. “Good afternoon my friends we are airing from the City of New York your program ‘Hoy No es Un Día Cualquiera’ (Today is Not an Ordinary Day),” says Sosa before introducing her guest today, Paul Lagunes, a SIPA professor specializing in the study of corruption.

Her one-hour interview show is recorded at her studio on the 14th floor of the International Affairs Building and aired on Radio Caracas Radio, Venezuela’s oldest radio station. She started presenting the show daily in 2011 and producers decided to keep her as their radio host on Fridays from New York, when she moved from Caracas to start her degree at SIPA.

Over the last two years, Sosa has conducted interviews with some leading Latin American academics and politicians as well as with some of her fellow students. She says that the idea of her show is to use Columbia University as a platform for important ideas in the Venezuelan debate. She wishes to work in the field of communication and development after her graduation but would like to continue with her show. “Running the show has allowed me to stay connected to Venezuela and to link what I have learned in the master’s program with the necessities of my country”.

A SIPA Faculty Interview

July 17th, 2014 by Columbia SIPA

Eric Verhoogen, an associate professor of international and public affairs and economics, followed a somewhat unorthodox path to SIPA. “After college at Harvard, I was a high-school teacher in Los Angeles, and then tried my hand at journalism in Berkeley and at the Nation. Then I was a labor organizer in Minnesota and Ohio. And then I started grad school at UMass Amherst and later transferred to Berkeley.” After earning his PhD in 2004, he came directly to SIPA, where he received tenure in 2010.

In a study of soccer ball manufacturers in Pakistan, Professors Eric Verhoogen of SIPA and Amit Khandelwal, Gary Winnick and Martin Granoff of Columbia Business School found that how workers are paid, and whether or not incentives are offered, can promote or stifle the adoption of a new technology. Below were some additional information Verhoogen shared about the study and some other things he’s working on.

You found clearly that misaligned incentives can compromise the adoption of otherwise beneficial technology. Why is this significant, and what are the challenges inherent in a study like this?

It’s an interesting, important question for economic development and growth more generally. It’s also a hard question to study because it’s hard to observe technology use by manufacturing firms and rare to have information about the actual cost and benefits of technology.

This is partly because technologies vary a lot across firms, and particularly across sectors. And unlike other types of data, it’s hard to collect via survey—sometimes firms don’t want to share information. Economists have other methods to estimate productivity, but they’re all pretty indirect.

Why soccer balls? I realize it’s just a coincidence that we’re in the middle of the World Cup tournament.

With soccer-ball producers [in Sialkot, Pakistan], you have a pretty large number of firms, 135, producing a standardized product using similar technology. So the same basic production process is used by large and small firms alike. We thought we could introduce a new technology that would be useful to these guys, to producers, and focus on the diffusion process.

As the Columbia News story explains, Verhoogen and his team developed a fabric-cutting die that would enable producers to use fabric more efficiently, creating an opportunity to cut costs and increase profits.

Is it unusual that your team of researchers gave the manufacturers a technological advancement? Does it impact the study somehow?

In development economics, there’s been a broad trend over 15 or 20 years, of having more of these experimental interventions. There’s a large literature on technology adoption in agriculture where researchers share information about improved production processes. What’s more unusual about our study is that we are focusing on larger manufacturing firms and especially that we invented the technology we gave out.

So what happened when you introduced the new technology?

We gave the dies out in May 2012, and to be honest we were expecting very fast adoption. We were planning to focus on the diffusion process, seeing how the technology spread to firms we didn’t give it to.

We had evidence to indicate that the technology was working, that it was more efficient, but after 15 months only six firms had adopted the new technology. This was a puzzlingly low adoption rate, so we decided to write a paper about that.

The number-one reason firms didn’t adopt the new technology was that the employees were unwilling to use it. What became clear was that the cutters actually cutting the material are paid a piece rate per pentagon or hexagon. They want to go as fast as possible and don’t care about waste.

Our new technology slowed them down initially, certainly for the first month or two, and given their wage contract they have no incentive to adopt new technology. So we formulated this hypothesis that the misalignment of incentives was a key constraint to adoption.

We did a second experiment to probe this—we explained the misalignment and said we would pay a lump-sum bonus of one month’s salary, about $150, to the cutter if in one month he could demonstrate competence in the new technology.

The incentive program led to a 26 percent increase in probability of adoption of the new treatment. That such a small incentive targeted at workers could have a significant effect indicated to us that the misalignment of incentives is why the technology wasn’t being adopted.

Can you elaborate on the significance of your findings, and the study?

One piece of the big picture is that you have to have employee buy-in. Workers will only cooperate in the adoption of new technologies if they expect to gain—and if they don’t cooperate, they can effectively block it.

Also, by introducing the innovation we were able to actually observe the process and statistically distinguish between different hypotheses, as opposed to in case studies. This was a particularly clean setting, and we have a strong argument that the new technology is beneficial for essentially all firms.

I think this sort of thing happens all the time in many different settings. We happened to be able to observe it in one setting, but we think there are many incremental changes that could be made in different settings, and make a big difference.

Traditional economists sometimes say there can’t be a $100 bill on the sidewalk because if there were, someone would pick it up. We think this is a $100 bill on the sidewalk, but firms aren’t picking it up.

You’re also the director of SIPA’s Center for Development Economics and Policy. How has CDEP been received since it formally launched in November 2013?

There’s a lot of enthusiasm about development economics at SIPA. There’s been a great response from students and faculty members, and also from people outside SIPA.

We have a couple of initiatives that are gaining momentum. One is a human capital initiative for human education and health issues—what leads someone to acquire education, what factors shape education and health, and what are the consequences of that for a labor market. Another is our firms and innovations initiative, which examines issues around industrial upgrading in developing countries— the question of why some countries can grow and thrive in world economy and some less so.

Another coincidence with the World Cup… you’re also pursuing research in Brazil.

In Brazil, with support from the President’s Global Innovation Fund, I have a project on the interaction between labor market regulation and innovation at the firm level.

The question is, how do firms respond to labor market regulation? Economists tend to think of the effect of labor regulation as uniformly negative, but we’re investigating whether there are less familiar but important positive effects on firm behavior.

For example, the minimum wage in Brazil has risen a lot. The minimum wage affects the relative cost of hiring different types of workers, more low-skill than high-skill. If you give firms incentive to upgrade the composition of their workforce that may in turn induce them to use higher quality inputs, to produce higher quality outputs for sale to richer people in Brazil or richer export markets.

You’ve lived and worked in many different and interesting places. After almost 10 years here, how does SIPA measure up?

I very much like being at SIPA and teaching SIPA students because it keeps me grounded in the world. Our students have experience in the world and they’re planning to go back and be involved in things on the ground—I think it’s healthy and stimulating for me to be exposed to them and to be at a place that respects policy-oriented work. I got into this job to make the world a better place and I haven’t given up hope that that’s possible.

No one likes to talk about it, but it’s important to get accurate tuition information

July 16th, 2014 by Columbia SIPA

SIPA, like most schools at Columbia, has its own Financial Aid Office to assist our students.  However, the office responsible for posting charges on student accounts, billing, collecting payments and issuing refunds, is Student Financial Services (SFS), a centralized office serving the entire University.  SIPA’s Financial Aid Office does not send you your tuition bills, collect payments, or the other procedures mentioned above.

The SFS website can be found at http://sfs.columbia.edu/.

Some important information related to your bill and your student account:

  • SFS will send an email to your Columbia email address (your UNI) on or about August 11 with a link to a preliminary bill, which must be paid in full by September 12.  You can see the billing schedule at http://sfs.columbia.edu/files/sfs/content/statement_schedule_2014-2015.pdf.
  • Accounts not paid in full by the due date are subject to late fees, which are assessed monthly.
  • Interest-free monthly payment plans are available (see http://sfs.columbia.edu/billing/ways-to-pay#payment-plan).
  • Financial aid that has been fully processed is credited to your account.  Please respond to all requests for documentation from the Financial Aid Office promptly, as failure to do so will prevent your aid from being credited to your account.
  • The state of New York requires all full-time students to have health insurance.  Your bill will include a charge for health insurance, which can be waived if you have equivalent coverage.  For more information, visit http://www.health.columbia.edu/student-insurance/enroll-waive-student-health-insurance.
  • If your aid in any semester exceeds your tuition and fees, you will receive a refund of that credit balance approximately one to two weeks into the semester.  Please plan your non-tuition expenses (rent, food, transportation, etc) accordingly.
  • You can receive refunds payments for which you qualify by direct deposit (recommended, otherwise you’ll receive them by a hard copy check through the mail); go to Student Services Online (SSOL) at https://ssol.columbia.edu/ to set this up.
  • SFS accepts electronic checks for payment via SSOL, but does not accept credit cards.
  • If your bill is being paid by a sponsor or third party, please see http://sfs.columbia.edu/billing/sponsored-students for important instructions.
  • See SFS’s website for mailing addresses if you are paying by mail.
  • Remember that the federal government deducts fees from loan disbursements, 1.073% for the Direct Unsubsidized Loan, and 4.292% on the Graduate PLUS loan.

Seeple Snapshot: Amon Simutowe

July 15th, 2014 by Columbia SIPA

Amon

The Chess Star: Amon Simutowe

Nationality: Zambia

Age: 32

MIA 2014

While many SIPA students will go on to have remarkable professional careers, it is not that common to meet one who has already made history. At the age of 27 in 2009, Amon Simutowe became the first Chess Grandmaster from Sub-Saharan Africa. The title Grandmaster is awarded to world-class chess players by the world chess organization FIDE. The achievement of this Zambian student is all the more remarkable considering he taught himself at the relatively late age of 10 and grew up in a country with little tradition of chess competitions. In Zambia, soccer is the most popular sport, but in 2001, Simutowe was named “Sportsman of the Year” by the Zambian Sports Council.

His victories were featured on the front pages of Zambian newspapers, something that gave domestic visibility to chess. “I cannot complain of the attention and support I got,” he says. While at SIPA, Simutowe has been writing an instructional book with the aim of encouraging kids in Africa to develop a liking for the game. The book was released after his graduation in May. Although he is not currently playing at tournament level, chess takes over much of his free time. “I usually play on Friday evenings, to get my brain to relax”, he says. “I cannot stop playing chess, for me it’s like an addiction”.

Summerfest 2014 in NEW YORK CITY

July 14th, 2014 by Columbia SIPA

Before the summer is over, you need to attend at least one Summerfest.  You may have missed the other two in DC but you still have one more chance to beat the heat in New York.

What?  You still haven’t figured out what Summerfest is?  It’s just the event of the summer and place to be if you are interested in a career in international affairs.

Join us for an evening and we promise you will meet alumni, students and staff from five top graduate programs in international affairs and learn about the graduate programs, career opportunities and network with professionals in international affairs.

Representatives from the following graduate international affairs programs will be available:

  • Columbia University – School of International and Public Affairs (SIPA)
  • Georgetown University – Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service
  • Johns Hopkins University – The Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS)
  • Princeton University – The Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs
  • Tufts University – The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy

We’re being hosted by the Roosevelt House Public Policy Institute at Hunter College, 47-49 East 65th Street in New York City (10065 – if you need the postal code to plug into your GPS).

Be there on Wednesday, July 16 (that’s in 2 days).  Doors open at 5:30pm… stay for a few minutes or until the “party” is over at 8:00pm.  Admissions representatives (and alumni/students) will be available all evening.  Bonus:  there will also be two alumni panel Q&A presentations at 6:00pm and 7:00pm.

So what are you waiting for?  RSVP and share this with friends and colleagues.

See you at Summerfest 2014!

New SIPA Student Photo Series #3

July 10th, 2014 by Columbia SIPA

As an entrepreneur and consultant, Jean Suhas has traveled across Europe, South America, North America, Asia, North Africa, and Sub-Saharan Africa.

But what he encountered in Hanoi, Vietnam was worthy of a photo submission.  You don’t see one of these every day.

Jean is an incoming Master of International Affairs candidate.

Jean Suhas

 

Applying for graduate school? Things you can start doing now.

July 9th, 2014 by Columbia SIPA

You’re thinking about going back to graduate school?  Graduate school can be a rewarding experience where you can explore, engage and think… while establishing yourself for career advancement or  job opportunities in your chosen path of study.  But keep in mind graduate school is a huge commitment and it does not guarantee that you will end up with the job of your dreams (at least not immediately).

If you have made up your mind about going to graduate school, here are a couple of things to do before applying:

Research graduate school programs that may interest you and find out if you are qualified or not.  You should also find out what are their requirements and deadlines to be considered for admission.  A prospective candidate showed me her color-coordinated spreadsheet to keep track of the different programs, deadlines, requirements and contact information — this is a great way to keep yourself organized especially if you are considering several programs.  Go to fairs, speak to admissions counselors, attend information sessions, visit the school and sit in a class or two.

Make sure you meet all the requirements to apply.

Ask your professors and supervisors if they would be willing to write a letter of recommendation on your behalf. Ask early in the applications process so they have as much time as needed to prepare the letter. Provide them with the information of where to send the letter.  Also send them your personal statement and your resume.

I mentioned personal statement; think about what it is that you wish to convey to the Admissions Committees.  Your statement/essay will help you tell your story and why a particular program/school is the best place for you to get your education given your goals and interests — tailor the essays to the program/school you are applying.  It also gives the committees an opportunity to get to know you more personally.  Be sure to cover all the points that the school asks you to address in your essays.  And most importantly proofread before submitting them.

Prepare your resume/CV. You should also include any academic awards or scholarships you’ve earned.

Request your official transcripts from all your Universities/colleges you have attended, but keep in mind, you may submit unofficial scanned copies for review — so no rush on getting the official transcripts to us immediately.

And remember it’s never too soon to start researching scholarship opportunities.  SIPA keeps a database of external scholarships we hear about that are relevant for our students, so begin there.  Graduate school can be expensive so thinking about your finances early is always smart.

PLUS Loan information

July 8th, 2014 by Columbia SIPA

Some SIPA students find that they need additional resources beyond the $20,500 annual limit of an Unsubsidized Federal Direct Loan and other aid they have received.  The loan most SIPA students turn to is the Federal Graduate PLUS Loan.  This loan (which is credit-based) can be borrowed up to the full cost of attendance, including living expenses, minus any other loans and aid; please note that like all aid from the US federal government, it is only available to US citizens and permanent residents.

To start an application: Log in to the Net Partner portal at https://studentviewer.finaid.columbia.edu and go to the Messages tab.  There you will see a section labeled “Unmet Financial Need” that includes instructions for the Grad PLUS loan.  Follow the link to the Graduate PLUS Loan Request and Credit Authorization form.  That will bring you to a Google document that will just take a few minutes to complete and submit.  You will receive an approval response in a few days directly from the US Department of Education.

After receiving the approval, log in to www.studentloans.gov to complete the PLUS Master Promissory Note and Entrance Counseling.

Some private lenders offer similar loans.  While their interest rates may be lower, they also don’t include as many repayment benefits or flexibility, including not qualifying for Public Service Loan Forgiveness.  But if you’re only borrowing a small amount, some private loans may fit your needs; click here for some suggestions.

 

July 4th office hours

July 3rd, 2014 by Columbia SIPA

In celebration of Independence Day in the U.S., our offices will be closed tomorrow July 4.  We will resume regular office hours from 9:00am to 5:00pm on Monday, July 7.

Have a happy and safe weekend.

New SIPA Student Photo Series #2

June 24th, 2014 by Columbia SIPA

Today’s submission comes from Karen Mustiga, MPA 2016.

Karen was born in Lima, Peru and immigrated to the U.S. in the 1990s.  Her disposition for public service and helping out the less fortunate comes from her roots and keen awareness to third-world poverty, political turmoil, and immigrant experience.  She plans to concentrate her studies in Urban and Social Policy.  We look forward to welcoming Karen to SIPA this fall.

 

Mallorca 2014

Photo taken in Mallorca:  A photo of my friend Tom and I in Mallorca this past May. I’ve had the pleasure of visiting most of Spain while teaching English in Madrid and Mallorca was definitely a trip worth taking. As a Florida native, I was impressed by the breathtakingly beautiful beaches and stunning cliffs.

New SIPA Student Photo/Story Series #1

June 20th, 2014 by Columbia SIPA

We kick off the 2014 new student summer photo (and story) series today with a photo submission from incoming MIA student, Supriya Kumar.  Ms. Kumar, a global nomad who has lived in five countries on three continents will be joining SIPA this fall.

Photo taken at the Taj Mahal, in Agra, India

Photo taken at the Taj Mahal, in Agra, India

 

Here is a photo of my friend Susan and I at the Taj Mahal this June. Words cannot really describe the overwhelming beauty of this structure – it is quite surely a sight that has to be seen in person to really appreciate, and I’m so grateful that I was lucky to pay it a visit this summer.

 

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If you are an incoming SIPA student and have photos or stories you would like to share with our community, please send them to sipa_new@columbia.edu.

 

 

New SIPA Student (photo/story) Series 2014

June 16th, 2014 by Columbia SIPA

Summer officially begins this weekend but school is out and for most, summer is already here with lazy days and mild summer temperatures.

If you are a follower of the SIPA Admissions Blog, you will know that each summer we run a series of new students’ photos.  Last year we included stories about their summer adventure prior to beginning classes at SIPA in the fall.  Blog readers have informed us that they like seeing/reading what our students are up to each summer.  Well, it’s that time of year again when we make a request for submissions.

All you NEW SIPA STUDENTS, we encourage you to submit pictures (travel photos, artistic photos, event photos) to post and share on the Blog.  If you would rather provide a short post about what you are doing this summer before enrolling at SIPA, we’ll be happy to share that too.  We typically post 3 photos per student so the maximum number to send along for consideration should be no more than four.  If you are sending a story about your summer activities, please limit it to five paragraphs.

To participate, simply send along your photos or story as attachments to this address: sipa_new@columbia.edu.  Please include the subject: 2014 Blog submission.   We will try to post everyone’s submission but it may take a few weeks/months (depending on how many people are willing to share their experience) for us to share all of them this summer.

If you plan to submit (and experience at least 24-hours of fame), please include the following when submitting your pictures/story:

  • Your Name
  • Your Degree Program (MIA, MPA, MPA-DP)
  • Where the photo was taken (if submitting a photo)
  • A brief description of the photo (if submitting a photo)

Looking forward to receiving your submissions.

 

Seeple Snapshot: Katherine McGehee

June 12th, 2014 by Columbia SIPA

K McGehee

Katherine McGehee, MIA 2015   

Concentration: EPD   Specialization: Management    
Hometown: New York, NY          
College/ University attended: University of Virginia
Undergraduate Major: International Affairs/French       

Traveled to: Austria, Belgium, Denmark, France, Germany, Ireland, Italy, Monaco, Netherlands, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, UK, Bahamas, Barbados, Bermuda, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, Jamaica, Puerto Rico, Turks and Caicos, St. Barts, Virgin Islands, Mexico, South Africa

Hobbies: The Arts (ballet, theater, museums, exhibitions, art shows), avid follower of current events, academic interest in francophone countries, travel, cooking, languages

Languages: French (fluent), English (fluent), Mandarin (basic), Italian (learning)

After SIPA, I hope to remain in New York City working for a foundation and specializing in public-private partnerships. I would also be happy working in the private sector with a focus on public sector engagement. Either way, I am very interested in public-private partnerships, particularly in regards to corporate social responsibility. Since SIPA is such a global school, I am very open to moving abroad after graduation. However, I do hope to start out a company in New York.   “Though I am American, I have always grown up in a very diverse and global environment. From age six and on, I attended the United Nations International School where I was among 17% of Americans in a 1,200 person school. SIPA’s commitment to enrolling an international student body really drew me to the school and that quality is one reason why I am so happy at SIPA. Most of my friends at SIPA are from abroad and I love hearing about their backgrounds and their goals after school. It has really given me a whole new perspective.

After the University of Virginia, I worked for a year at Doctors With Out Borders in New York. I was part of the advocacy department team. My responsibilities mainly involved following political contexts in regions and specific countries (Doctors Without Borders has programs in over 80 countries) for organization-wide reports on current activities, tracking US policy changes in countries of interest, monitoring broader trends on aid, food security, global healthcare, and patent laws, translating media and documents from French to English, and responding to program inquiries.

At SIPA, I am concentrating in Economic and Political Development and specializing in management. Both disciplines provide a lot of opportunity to learn more about corporate social responsibility and effective development programs, which relates to what I would like to do after finishing school. Currently, I am part of several SIPA student groups, including UNSP, the Journal of International Affairs, and the consulting club. I participated in a public policy case competition in the fall, which was a wonderful opportunity to network with leaders in consulting and to develop real-world solutions to social, political, and economic challenges. Outside of SIPA, I am serving as a youth representative to the United Nations through a small NGO called the World Council of Peoples for the United Nations (WCPUN).”

For me, what makes SIPA is its students. My classmates are so inspirational, have such diverse backgrounds, and a very driven and enthusiastic attitude. I have felt discouraged by setbacks, like difficulty understanding course material, not getting into a class or program, or not hearing back from an internship. My classmates at SIPA have been my greatest supporters. They have offered suggestions for internships, help in classes, and just general encouragement. Sometimes SIPA can be overwhelming because it is so rigorous academically and has so many things to be involved in. Fellow students support your interest and help keep you focused on your goals.     I chose SIPA because I wanted a place that could open doors in New York and internationally. Its name is respected on a global scale but it is still a much respected school here in the city. Since I plan to stay in New York after graduation, I wanted a place that would position me well for the short term (NYC) and long term (abroad). I also wanted a school with a practitioner focus. SIPA’s capstone component really separates it from the pack of policy schools. I am so excited to participate in a capstone project next year and gain tangible skills that are really marketable when applying to jobs.

 

Events of the Summer!

June 10th, 2014 by Columbia SIPA

SUMMERFEST is upon us once again!  If you’re thinking about a career in international affairs, you need to be here.

Summerfest is an annual forum for prospective students interested in graduate programs in international affairs.

We will host two events in Washington, DC — June 17 and July 9.  And for the first time, Summerfest is coming to New York City on July 16!

Alumni, current students and staff representing top professional schools will be available to answer questions.  There will also be an alumni panel presentation at each of the events.

g5 long logo

We hope you will join us to learn more about our schools and take advantage of the opportunity to network with international affairs professionals.

Register for DC or Register for NYC.

Update on the Yellow Ribbon Program

June 9th, 2014 by Columbia SIPA

If you are an incoming SIPA student (or a continuing one — unless you are already a SIPA YRP recipient) and are 100% GI Bill eligible, then make sure you don’t throw away the chance to get more funding.   For more information about our Yellow Ribbon Program participation, read the May 28 post.

The Yellow Ribbon scholarship application is now live at https://sipa.columbia.edu/admissions/applying-to-sipa/financial-aid/sipa-columbia-funding.

In order to be considered, you will need to submit a completed application by June 27.  SIPA cannot guarantee funding for every eligible candidate, and funding will be on a first come, first served basis for eligible candidates.

 

We’re going to Chicago!

June 3rd, 2014 by Columbia SIPA

Thinking about going back to school?  The first question you ask yourself is what do you want to study?  The second question is where do you go to pursue your studies?

The Public Service Graduate School Fair brings together representatives of some of the nation’s top graduate programs in public policy and international affairs with highly qualified individuals who are interested in making a difference. So if this is your “thing”, come meet us on Friday, June 20, 2014 from 1:30 PM to 3:30 PM at the University of Chicago.

Young professionals, undergraduates, and recent grads alike can benefit from the expertise and guidance they can access through this event.

Learn about the graduate school admissions process!

Attendees of this Graduate School Fair receive access to key decision makers in the admissions process at the nation’s top policy and international affairs schools. Prospective applicants have an opportunity to ask questions about various policy programs, what makes a strong candidate, and carefully consider which programs align with their interests and careers.

Recognizing the importance of networks, this event provides a crucial meeting point for students to exchange of ideas, information, and inspiration.

Register today

Participating Graduate Schools

  • American University, School of International Service
  • Carnegie Mellon University, John H. Heinz III College
  • Columbia University, School of International and Public Affairs
  • Duke, Sanford School of Public Policy
  • Georgetown, Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service
  • Harvard University, Harvard Kennedy School
  • Indiana University – Bloomington, School of Public & Environmental Affairs
  • Johns Hopkins University, Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies
  • Princeton University Woodrow Wilson School of Public Policy & International Affairs
  • Science Po, Paris School of International Affairs
  • Syracuse, Maxwell School of Citizenship & Public Affairs
  • Texas A&M, The Bush School of Government and Public Service
  • The George Washington University, The Elliott School of International Affairs
  • Tufts, The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy
  • University of California, San Diego, School of International Relations & Pacific Studies
  • University of Denver, Josef Korbel School of International Studies

Date:

Friday, June 20, 2014
1:30 PM to 3:30 PM

Location:
The University of Chicago School of Social Service Administration
969 E. 60th Street
Chicago, IL 60637

Environmental Defense Fund’s Climate Corps 2014

June 2nd, 2014 by Columbia SIPA

The Energy and Environment program is representing SIPA proudly in the Environmental Defense Fund’s Climate Corps 2014 with seven fellows! The selective summer fellows program places top graduate students from around the United States in leadership-focused companies here and abroad. The Climate Corps projects aim to reduce energy consumption, increase renewable energy production, and help forward-thinking companies prepare themselves for 21st-century business practices and advancement.

Felise Man (EE 2015) will be working with CSX freight and rail company to increase energy efficiency practices throughout the company. Eric Schrago (EE 2015) will be working with Adidas to increase corporate and supply chain energy efficiencies. Rebecca Miaomiao Shao (EE 2015) will be working with Apple’s Global Energy Team and helping the company achieve its net zero energy consumption goal. Brandon Tarbert (EE 2015) will be working with Williams-Sonoma to develop and expand their renewable energy portfolio to reduce the carbon footprint associated with Williams-Sonoma’s energy consumption. Michael Didyk (EE/MBA 2015) will be with Caesars Entertainment, Sana Ouji (EE 2015) will be with Taylor Morrison, and Jan Schwarting (EE 2015) will be with Warburg Pincus.

EE photo

Environmental Defense Fund’s Climate Corps 2014

 

Post submitted by Brandon Tarbert, MPA 2015

Interested in a Columbia University Interschool Fellowships?

May 30th, 2014 by Columbia SIPA

Each year, Columbia makes a few scholarships and fellowships available to students from all schools within the University. These awards, known as Interschool Fellowships, are the result of donations from generous supporters of the University and tend to have very specific eligibility criteria. To see if you may meet the eligibility criteria required to apply for these awards, please review them at: http://sfs.columbia.edu/grad-institutional-aid.

If you meet the full criteria for one or more of these Interschool Fellowships, to apply please go to: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/viewform?usp=drive_web&formkey=dDZqVzNQQVJvUE5EbF9Pc0JqQWFmT0E6MA#gid=0

Please do not apply for an award for which you do not meet all criteria. Applications that do not meet the full criteria, or applications that are incomplete, will not be accepted. If there is any required documentation indicated for the award/s for which you are applying, please submit that to the SIPA Financial Aid Office by Monday June 16.

As these awards are for Columbia students University-wide, SIPA does not choose the recipients, we can only nominate eligible applicants. Decisions are made by central administration, and those decisions are final. Decisions will be made in mid-August.

Please submit all applications to the SIPA Financial Aid Office no later than the close of business, Monday June 16, so that we can properly review all applications.

Yellow Ribbon Program

May 28th, 2014 by Columbia SIPA

The Columbia University School of International and Public Affairs is pleased to announce the application for the Yellow Ribbon Program Scholarship, available to eligible veterans of the US Armed Forces, for the 2014/15 academic year.

The Yellow Ribbon Program is an initiative authorized by the Veterans Educational Assistance Act of 2008 (the Post-9/11 GI Bill) in which educational institutions provide eligible student veterans with a partial tuition waiver or grant matched by the U.S. Department of Veteran Affairs. This program supplements the base educational benefits provided by the Post-9/11 GI Bill. To be eligible for the Yellow Ribbon Program, you must be a US veteran eligible for the maximum level (100%) of benefits under the Post-9/11 GI Bill according to your VA Certificate of Eligibility. If you are a veteran of the US Armed Forces and would like to learn more about eligibility for these benefits, please visit the GI Bill website at www.gibill.va.gov/.

SIPA is committed to honoring those who have served our country by being one of seventeen individual schools at Columbia University participating in the Yellow Ribbon Program.   An application is required and will be available on our website by Monday June 9, 2014 at noon, Eastern Daylight Time. The application will be a Google document that is to be submitted online; no other documentation is required. Those who received a Yellow Ribbon scholarship at SIPA in the 2013/14 academic year and will be enrolled at SIPA for 2014/15 [and have maintained their eligibility] need not reapply, the award will be renewed in an amount based on available funding.

SIPA cannot guarantee funding for every eligible candidate, and funding will be on a first come, first served basis, so please make sure that you complete the application no later than June 27, 2014.